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LPD Press & Rio Grande Books

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One of the most comprehensive locations for information on art and culture in the Southwest,
with information on traditional and contemporary
Native American and Hispanic arts, Southwestern history, and books.



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by Joseph Sanchez & Bruce Erickson

348 pages 6x9 paperback

Forged from Native American pathways, the Camino Real de los Tejas and its variants became an important transportation corridor during the Spanish Colonial period of Texas. Following the explorations of Alonso de León, between 1686 and 1690, Spanish missionaries and soldiers began the earliest European settlements in Texas. Mexican Territorial and early Anglo-American period immigrants to Texas also contributed much information about its people, land, and trails.
Through their diaries, correspondence and maps, Spanish explorers, missionaries, and settlers provided an historical and ethnographic context about the early history of Texas. Today, historians and archaeologists utilize key historical texts in their studies about Texas and its early roads. The significance of the Camino Real de los Tejas and its variants, to the history of Texas and our national story, is clearly demonstrated in their scholarly works used in this publication.
In 2004, the United States Congress designated the Camino Real de los Tejas National Historic Trail. Later, in 2015, UNESCO designated San Antonio Missions National Historical Park as a World Heritage Site. Such honors pay tribute to the significance of early Hispanic missionaries and settlers in Texas and Coahuila who, between 1690 and 1821, developed towns, ranches, fortifications, missions, and a mighty road to support such enterprises. In that way, they too touched the future of Texas and our national story. The heritage of the Camino Real de los Tejas is shared by Spain, Mexico, the United States and regional Native American tribes. The present work, From Saltillo, Mexico to San Antonio and East Texas: An Historical Guide to El Camino Real de Tierra Afuera and El Camino Real de los Tejas during the Spanish Colonial Period, is an important step taken to reconcile the historiographical literature with the historical record.


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New Mexico Historical Encyclopedia
by Don Bullis

30% OFF
($45@ hardback (reg. $62.95)
or ($35@ soft back (reg. $48.95)






Historical Encyclopedia








New Mexico Historical Biographies
by Don Bullis

30% OFF
($45@ hardback (reg. $62.95)
or ($35@ soft back (reg. $48.95)






Historical Biographies







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The Complete Space Buff’s Bucket List
by Loretta Hall

25% OFF ($12@ (reg. $15.95)








What Makes a Snowflake
by Ross Van Dusen

25% OFF ($16.50@ (reg. $21.95)










The Complete Cowboy Bucket List
by Slim Randles

25% OFF ($12@ (reg. $15.95)











Rio Grande Books is Honored
to Receive these Special Awards

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RECENT REVIEWS

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WEEKLY ALIBI:
“This book is basically a complete history of Jewish involvement in New Mexico,” John Hoffsis of Treasure House Books said of this anthology of articles collected in 30 years of work by the New Mexico Jewish Historical Society. This winner of the 2015 New Mexico-Arizona Book Awards “Best Religious Book” category is “very thorough” according to Hoffsis and provides excellent, sometimes overlooked, context on New Mexico’s rich history.”
WEEKLY ALIBI:
“Retired graphic artist Ross Van Dusen takes on topics in science through his adorable and accessible children’s books. “This book is done in such a lovely, fun way,” Hoffsis said of this book, the winter-time companion to the earlier “What Makes a Rainbow?” “It explains science to young children with very funny rhymes. The writing is very memorable.”
WEEKLY ALIBI:
“Nasario Garcia is one of the best know folklorists in New Mexico,” Hoffsis explained, “he’s written a lot about oral histories, but lately what he’s been doing is writing about his childhood.” This lovely children’s book, with vibrant illustrations, recipes and a small Spanish-English glossary describes his life growing up in the Rio Puerto Valley and his grandmother’s fantastic tamales. “It’s just a delightful book.”



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PRIME TIME:
Ever fixed — not cooked, but fixed — a dutch oven dinner? Ever gone to barrel racing school? How about visited Annie Oakley’s birthplace? If you haven’t checked these things, and many others, off your bucket list, let me just say, “Get a move on little doggie.” Slim Randles can help you with the list in his new book, The Complete Cowboy Bucket List: 100 Cowboys Things to Do Before You Put Your Horse Up and Go to the House.Randles has had a 40-year career as an author and columnist. His Home Country column, which is syndicated all across the world to more than 4 million readers, lives in a small cabin in the middle of “nowhere at the foot of the Manzano Mountains.” He has written 16 other books in his career. He states in his forward to his Bucket list book, “So I chased wild burros in Death Valley, chased wild horses in the Coso Range, chases (in futility) after prize money in rodeos, and chased girls in college . . . Didn’t pay much, but it sure was fun.” Fun is what he says any cowboy or cowgirl will have with his newest book. The cowboy life, it seems for a guy named “Slim”, is ver rewarding. His bucket list offers 100 ideas to live out a pretty good idea of what is needed before, as he states, you put your horse up. “You realize, don’t you, that we’re the ones who are blessed with the companionship of horses and mules and each other,” Randles asks. “We’re the ones who get to hear … and tell … the stories in the bunkhouses and around the campfires. It’s a great life, all in all.” Randles asks his readers to dive into the book, and get some ideas, act on them. The end to his foreword in the book reads: “Have a good time. Learn something and pass it on. And save some room at the fire, will you?”
ABQ JOURNAL:
Here’s a book that’s for you folks who aren’t cowboys – or cowgirls – but have secretly dreamed of being one.
It reads nice and easy as if personable Albuquerque author Slim Randles were advising you to choose items you want from his bucket list.
The list is comprised of things to visit and things to do. It is numbered from number 100 down to No. 1. Each listing receives its own page; photographs accompany the text.
No. 100 is see Horsehead Crossing of the Pecos (River). Randles writes that the crossing was initially used for cattle drives by Charles Goodnight and Oliver Loving as part of the trail from Texas to New Mexico named for them. The crossing is near a farm road northwest of Girvin, Texas.
For the last-mentioned item, No.1, Randles suggests the reader sign up for rodeo bullfighting school in Branson, Mo.
In between are activities that could occupy you for months, if not years. It could mean traveling from the East Coast to Hawaii, attending rodeos, visiting museums, joining a wagon train, going to cowboy poetry gatherings, buying a GOOD cowboy hat. Or maybe taking a horseback tour of Mongolia.
Or it could mean exploring bucket list opportunities on day trips from home.
If you’re a New Mexico resident, you can take advantage of the list’s large number of activities right here in the state.
Visit Folsom Man Site, where a black cowboy discovered archaeological artifacts. Take a tour of the southernmost hideout on the Outlaw Trail (today it’s on the WS Ranch) near Reserve. See Kit Carson’s grave in Taos. Go to the Lincoln County Courthouse where Billy the Kid killed two deputies. Check out Carlsbad Caverns, which were first explored by a cowboy.
Worn out yet? Randles wasn’t when he completed the list.
“I could have done 200 without breaking a sweat,” he said in a phone interview.
Randles grew up in El Monte, Calif., back when it resembled Albuquerque’s South Valley today.
“We had an acre. A lot of people did… I grew up with horses, got my first at age 14,” he recalled.
“I was a mulepacker in the High Sierras for eight years and as a hunting guide I used animals as well. …I was a packer, I trained horses, was a dude wrangler but I was never really a working ranch cowboy.”
Randles, a former Journal reporter/columnist, has been writing a syndicated newspaper column called “Home Country.”
For the sedentary, the back of the book has a list of “Cowboy Music” and a list of “Cowboy Movies.”
The book is part of Rio Grande Books’ bucket list series. Randles is currently writing a fly fisherman’s bucket list book.



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Congratulations to Rio Grande Books and its Authors:

2016 New Mexico Press Women
First Place, History: “The Jewish Legacy in New Mexico History” edited by Richard Melzer
First Place, Children’s Fiction: “How the Crocka Dog Came to Be” by Ross Van Dusen
Second Place, Children’s Fiction: “Ol’ Jimmy Dollar” by Slim Randles
First Place, Children’s Nonfiction: “What Makes a Snowflake?” by Ross Van Dusen
Second Place, Children’s Nonfiction: “What Makes a Rainbow? by Ross Van Dusen
Honorable Mention, Travel Book: “The Basic New Mexico Bucket List” by Barbe Awalt
Honorable Mention, Travel Book: “The Ultimate Hot Air Balloon Bucket List” by Barbe Awalt

2016 Historical Society of New Mexico
Lansing B. Bloom Award for Outstanding Publication on New Mexico or Southwest Borderland History: “The Jewish Legacy in New Mexico History” edited by Richard Melzer

2015 Gelett Burgess Children’s Book Award
Gold Medal, Lifestyle Category, How Chile Came to New Mexico by Rudy Anaya, translated by Nasario Garcia, and illustrated by Nicolas Otero

2015 New Mexico-Arizona Book Awards
Winners
Children’s Picture Book, Ol’ Jimmy Dollar by Slim Randles
Children’s Bilingual Picture Book, Grandma Lale’s Tamales by Nasario Garcia
Pets/Animals, More Pet Friends by Terrie Q Sayre & Travelin’ Jack
Reference Book, A River Runs Through Us by Richard Melzer & John Taylor
Religious Book, The Jewish Legacy in New Mexico History by Richard Melzer
Science, What Makes a Rainbow? by Ross Van Dusen
Sports/Recreation, The Ultimate Hot Air Balloon Bucket List by Barbe Awalt
Travel Book, The Basic New Mexico Bucket List by Barbe Awalt
Young Readers Book, The Talking Lizard by Nasario Garcia
Best Cover Design (<6x9), The Basic New Mexico Bucket List by Paul Rhetts, designer
Best Cover Design Trade (larger than 6x9), Grandma Lale’s Tamales, cover design and illustrations by Dolores Aragon
Best Cover Design (>6x9), Ol’ Jimmy Dollar, cover design by Jerry Montoya
Best Cover Design Non Trade (larger than 6x9), The Adventures of BernCo Bernie cover design and illustrations by Marisol Baird

Finalists
Children’s Bilingual Picture Book, The Adventures of BernCo Bernie by Jill Lane
Multicultural Subject, Grandma Lale’s Tamales by Nasario Garcia

Children’s Picture Book, Don’t Touch This Book! by Barbe Awalt
Cover Design (>6x9), Don’t Touch This Book!, cover design by Paul Rhetts
Pets/Animals, Ol’ Jimmy Dollar by Slim Randles
Children’s Picture Book, What Makes a Rainbow? by Ross Van Dusen
Cover Design (>6x9), What Makes a Rainbow? by Ross Van Dusen
Juvenile Book, The Talking Lizard by Nasario Garcia
Cover Design (<6x9), The Talking Lizard, cover design by Jeremy Montoya
Cover Design (>6x9), More Pet Friends, cover design by Paul Rhetts
Reference Book, The Jewish Legacy in New Mexico History by Richard Melzer
Reference Book, Neighborhood: Twenty Five Years of Dysfunction by Barbe Awalt
Cover Design (6x9), A River Runs Through Us, cover design by Paul Rhetts
Cover Design (<6x9), The Ultimate Hot Air Balloon Bucket List by Paul Rhetts, designer
Cover Design (<6x9), Grandpa Lolo and Trampa, cover design by Jeremy Montoya
Cover Design (6x9), More Voices of New Mexico, cover design by Paul Rhetts

2015 International Latino Book Awards

First Place, Best History Book Bilingual: Bernalillo: Yesterday’s Sunshine Today’s Shadows by Nasario Garcia
First Place, Best Latino Focused Book Design: How Chile Came to New Mexico by Rudy Anaya, translated by Nasario Garcia, and illustrated by Nicolas Otero
First Place, Best Use of Illustrations Inside the Book: How Chile Came to New Mexico by Rudy Anaya, translated by Nasario Garcia, and illustrated by Nicolas Otero
Second Place, Best Children’s Fiction Picture Book Bilingual: How Chile Came to New Mexico by Rudy Anaya, translated by Nasario Garcia, and illustrated by Nicolas Otero
Honorable Mention/Finalist, Picture Book Bilingual: Grandma Lale’s Tamales by Nasario Garcia and illustrated by Dolores Aragon
Honorable Mention/Finalist, Most Inspirational Children’s Picture Book Bilingual: How Chile Came to New Mexico
Honorable Mention/Finalist, Best Interior Design: How Chile Came to New Mexico by Rudy Anaya, translated by Nasario Garcia, and illustrated by Nicolas Otero

2015 Southwest Book Design & Production Awards, New Mexico Book Association
Winner, Children & Young Adult Book, How Chile Came to New Mexico by Rudy Anaya, translated by Nasario Garcia, and illustrated by Nicolas Otero
Runner-up, Guides & Travel Books, Saddle-Up: Cowboy Guide to Writing by Slim Randles

2015 PubWest Design Awards
Bronze, History: Family History in the Rio Abajo by Andres Armijo

2015 Book Awards by the New Mexico Press Women Association
Best Children’s Fiction Book: How Chile Came to New Mexico by Rudolfo Anaya, illustrated by Nicolas Otero, and translated by Nasario García
Best Anthology: Bernalillo by Nasario García
2nd Place, Adult Non-fiction-History: Family History in the Rio Abajo by Andres Armijo
2nd Place, Children’s Fiction Book: Grandma Lale’s Tamales by Nasario Garcia
2nd Place, Adult Nonfiction-General: Space Pioneers by Loretta Hall
3rd Place, Children’s Fiction Book: Grandpa Lolo and Trampa by Nasario Garcia
3rd Place, Short Story Collections: Max Evans & A Few Friends by Ollie Reed, Ruthe Francis & Slim Randles
Honorable Mention, Children’s Fiction Book: The Talking Lizard by Nasario Garcia
Honorable Mention, Adult Nonfiction-History Book: Unsolved by Don Bullis
Honorable Mention, Adult Nonfiction-General: Saddle-Up: Cowboy Guide to Writing by Slim Randles
Second Place, Overall Excellence in Communications: Rio Grande Books

2015 Eric Hoffer Book Awards
Category Finalist, Saddle-Up: Cowboy Guide to Writing by Slim Randles

2015 Book Award by New Mexico Historical Society
Fabiola Cabeza de Baca Award: Family History in the Rio Abajo by Andres Armijo
Pablita Velarde Award: Grandma Lale’s Tamales: A Christmas Story” by Nasario Garcia

2015 INDIEFAB Awards by Foreword Magazine
Second Place, Science Book: Space Pioneers in their own words by Loretta Hall
Finalist, Juvenile Book: How Chile Came to New Mexico by Rudolfo Anaya, illustrated by Nicolas Otero, and translated by Nasario García

2014 Southwest Book of the Year by Border Regional Library Association
How Chile Came to New Mexico by Rudolfo Anaya, illustrated by Nicolas Otero, and translated by Nasario García

2014 Remarkable Latino Children’s Literature from Latinas for Latino Lit
How Chile Came to New Mexico by Rudolfo Anaya, illustrated by Nicolas Otero, and translated by Nasario García

2014 Moonbeam Children's Book Awards
Gold Medal, Multicultural Children's Picture Book How Chile Came to New Mexico by Rudolfo Anaya, illustrated by Nicolas Otero, and translated by Nasario García

2014 New Mexico-Arizona Book Awards

Best Book How Chile Came to New Mexico by Rudolfo Anaya, illustrated by Nicolas Otero, and translated by Nasario García
Best Book Space Pioneers in their own words by Loretta Hall
Best Cover Design (larger than 6x9) How Chile Came to New Mexico by Rudolfo Anaya, illustrated by Nicolas Otero, and translated by Nasario García
Best Cover Design (smaller than 6x9) Saddle Up: A Cowboy Guide to Writing by Slim Randles
Children's Picture Book bilingual How Chile Came to New Mexico by Rudolfo Anaya, illustrated by Nicolas Otero, and translated by Nasario García
History-New Mexico Bernalillo by Nasario García
History-New Mexico UNSOLVED by Don Bullis
How-to Book Saddle Up: A Cowboy Guide to Writing by Slim Randles
Nonfiction-Other Max Evans and a few friends by Ollie Reed, Jr, Ruth E Francis, and Slim Randles
Science Space Pioneers in their own words by Loretta Hall
Young Readers Grandpa Lolo and Trampa by Nasario García

Finalists in the 2014 New Mexico-Arizona Book Awards

Anthology UNSOLVED by Don Bullis
Anthology Literacy Alive by Sharleen Daugherty
Anthology Max Evans and a few friends by Ollie Reed, Jr, Ruth E Francis, and Slim Randles
Fiction-Other Literacy Alive by Sharleen Daugherty
History-New Mexico Family History in the Rio Abajo by Andres Armijo
History-New Mexico Space Pioneers in their own words by Loretta Hall
Multi-cultural Family History in the Rio Abajo by Andres Armijo
Young Adult Literacy Alive by Sharleen Daugherty
Best Cover Design Family History in the Rio Abajo by Andres Armijo
Best Cover Design Space Pioneers in their own words by Loretta Hall

THIRD PLACE, OVERALL EXCELLENCE: 2014 New Mexico Press Women Book Awards


LPD Press & Rio Grande Books


Faith and art have always been bound together, especially in the Southwest and the old Hispanic villages of New Mexico. LPD Press has built a regional publishing company whose mission is to share the stories of faith, history, culture, and art found in the Hispanic Southwest. Rio Grande Books has taken that foundation and has expanded beyond the boundaries of New Mexico and explores the history and culture of the entire Southwest. Together, they are recording tradition.

"Among their books are works on Hispanic pottery and historical works about Archbishop Jean Baptiste Lamy and Frank Applegate, who helped develop the art movement in New Mexico" -- Albuquerque Journal