The book is available for purchase here on this website as well as in stores all across the country.


Avenging Victorio

258 pages, 16 photos
$24.95 hardcover (ISBN 978-1-890689-26-1)



FINALIST, 2007 BEST BOOKS USA BOOK NEWS
FINALIST, 2007 NEW MEXICO BOOK AWARDS
SILVER MEDALIST-HISTORICAL FICTION, 2007 BOOKS OF THE YEAR, FOREWORD MAGAZINE
FINALIST, 2007 SOUTHWEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR, TUCSON-PIMA PUBLIC LIBRARY SYSTEM
FINALIST-HISTORICAL FICTION, 2008 INDIE EXCELLENCE BOOK AWARDS

Las Cruces Sun-News
Avenging Victorio was featured in the Las Cruces Sun-News on August 10, 2007:
"As Santa Fe prepares to host the world's largest show of American Indian arts and crafts, thousands of visitors travel to New Mexico to see and collect traditional and contemporary Indian art.

Before you visit shows, exhibits and galleries, you might want to do a some research online to learn more about your favorite art and collectibles or pick up a book that will offer insights on American Indian heritage, as well as arts, crafts and culture. Here are a few publications to get you started.

Two recent books have particular appeal for those interested in regional history.

Most of us who live in southern New Mexico have seen the remains of their intricate black-on-white pottery designs, but less is known about the Mogollon culture that produced these remarkable works.

In "Mimbres Society" (edited by Valli S. Powell-Marti and Patricia A. Gilman, University of Arizona Press, $50, www.uapress.arizona.edu), anthropologists gather and share research tracing the evolution of the unique culture and explore how their architecture may have fostered an egalitarian society.
"The Mimbres were among the first to break living spaces into apartment-style room blocks," the editors explain and also note that the book began as a Mogollon Conference in Las Cruces organized by historian and Coas Bookstore owner Patrick Beckett.

"Avenging Victorio" (by Dave DeWitt, Rio Grande Books, $24.95, www.avenging-victorio.com) is a novel based on the 1881 campaign of Apache warriors and their elderly leader Nana to avenge the death of the legendary Apache chief Victorio. DeWitt "convincingly presents both sides of the conflict between white settlers and Apache natives in this well-researched and fascinating historical novel," opines mystery writer Judith Van Gieson. References to regional history and colorful characters abound, from Billy the Kid to Gen. Edward Hatch and "Ben-Hur" author and territorial governor Lew Wallace.

These books are available through regional bookstores, online or from sources with each listing."

S. Derrickson Moore can be reached at
dmoore@lcsun-news.com