REVIEWS
This section contains reviews of many of our books from a variety of publications that cover Southwest and history-related books. We are proud of these reviews and share them with you here for all to see. We hope that these will assist you in evaluating some of our books.

When students from New Mexico College of Agriculture and Mechanical Arts (later NMSU) went off to war, their dean didn’t forget. Daniel B. Jett, Dean of Engineering from 1938 to 1947 was fondly known as “Dad” Jett to many of the students. When war called up his students, Jett carried on a personal correspondence with hundreds of young men and women. This book compiles the letters the kids wrote to Jett, including Jett’s responses. The back and forth of these letters boosted morale among the serving soldiers and nurses overseas and stateside. From a woman stationed in San Diego: “We got up every morning at 0545 (remember that Navy time I used to struggle with? I know it now!)” Besides being personable, the letters provide insights into the lives of those involved in world events during WWII. Photos/illustrations. —Enchantment, October 2010.

"Shoes for the Santo Nino/ Zapatitos para el Santo Nino: A Bilingual Tale" is an illustrated bilingual tale in Spanish and English for children ages 5-7. This charming tale about a holy Santo Nino (Christ Child) who heals children and receives shoes to continue his missions was originally published in the 1930s by famed new Mexican author Peggy Pond and is now being re-issued with new translations and illustrations so whole new generations of both cultures may continue to enjoy the story. Julianita, last of eleven children and spoiled and mothered by all her 11 siblings, decides she will make a new pair of shoes for the Christ Child, el Santo Nino, because the ones he is given wear out at least 2 or 3 times per year. Is the Santo Nino cavorting around the country side at night, or going on errands of mercy to help heal children everywhere? Julianita is determined to make her special shoes for the image of the Christ Child, hide, and watch to find out what happens. "He grows tired, I am sure," she says, (of having no one to play with." Scheming to decorate her special shoes with Indian silver buttons, Julianita, the spoiled, lazy hijita works hard to create special shoes for the Santo Nino. Perhaps she is growing up, her parents wonder, noting her unusual industriousness. Carefully Julianita makes her plans and steals to the church at night with her fine gift of shoes for el Santo Nino. Though she is afraid, she is delighted and surprised by what awaits her in the church. For the Christ Child has become a living boy who is delighted with her special gift, a boy even smaller than she is. The Santo Nino companions Julianita in his night odyssey and they see many marvels together. El Santo Nino speaks to the horse and the burro, asking after their welfare, and they answer him in wonderful words. The burro consents to carry both the little Christ Child and Julianita on their way. Amazingly, Julianita sees each of the creatures of the night communicating with the Christ Child, so gentle and so wise, even the tiny mouse and the humble jack-rabbit. Each creature addresses the Christ Child with reverence and respect. Gradually Julianita comes to realize the precious miracle that el Santo Nino has chosen to reveal to her: It is her own faith and belief. "Shoes for the Santo Nino" is a bicultural treasure tale that has been reborn to be fully enjoyed and appreciated by all who are lucky enough to share in it. The Spanish translations on each page and the colorful illustrations by award-winning artist Charles M. Carrillo enhance perfectly this beautiful tale of faith and reverence.
The book subtitle is longer than the title, but it efficiently condenses the goal behind the project — "A Navajo photographer's 365-day journey into a world of discovery, life and hope."
        Don James' journey takes him across the vast Navajo Nation.
        It begins on Feb. 8, 2008 with Loliane Tsosie, who is pictured tying a hay bale. Another photo is a close-up of her hands; the forefinger on her right hand is missing. It was sliced while mowing in an alfalfa field, the text says. Tsosie grew up ranching in Bowl Canyon, N.M.
        In between those pages are landscapes, objects, baseball players and portraits that reveal the hard work, pride and endurance of the Navajo people.
        Among them are saddle bronc rider Jerrick Hildreth of Coolidge, N.M.; Suzie James of Klageton, Ariz., who still shears sheep at age 73; Pete Gilmore, who started a boxing program in Kayenta, Ariz.; Eugene Chee Sr., a pastor in Oljeto, Utah, who preaches when he's not tending sheep; three men who started a consulting firm near St. Michaels, Ariz., that works with clients interested in environmentally friendly technology and alternative energy; Jack Jones, who lives in a small mobile home in Square Butte, Ariz., and must drive 15 miles to fill a tank with water for his home and livestock; and three musicians (Walter Hunter, Roy Ramone and Bobby Mariano) who formed the country band Full Diamond in Prewitt, N.M., in 2003.
        Short text blocks accompany many photos.
        The final image in the book is a road sign near Shiprock that thanks motorists for visiting the Navajo Nation and to return for more memories.
- - Albuquerque Journal

Anyone who’s seen the herds of curious pronghorns roaming New Mexico’s plains probably has a notion of what inspired Albuquerquean and longtime librarian Sabra Brown Steinsiek to write this fantastical tale about a herd of “cantaloupe.” These days, cantaloupe may just be simple fruits, but in this story set in days of yore, a more ornery and pronghorned variety roamed the land. The tale is delightfully imaginative: A boy and his fearless hunting dog try, with little success, to get past the cantaloupes’ wicked horns to a bit of their sweet fruit. Luckily, cantaloupe punchers and their “melon collies” bravely gather each year for a roundup, and all are finally rewarded with a juicy snack. This tales is best suited for children ages four to eight. — New Mexico Magazine


The subject of this imaginative tale is the phantasmagoric pronghorned cantaloupe, a wild, if fanciful, beast once native to New Mexico. These now extinct cantaloupes had “sharp, double-pronged horns” in place of stems which they used to steer as they rolled across the plains in greenish pink herds. Apparently, in the old days, they were rounded up in the fall by brave cantaloupe punchers and special dogs. The story comes complete with villains. The cantaloupes were just plain mean. One day, a band of cantaloupes even attacked Andy, the family dachshund. In order to save his dog, Dad, the hero, scored a direct hit on the nearest cantaloupe. His sliced it in two with his knife. Pronghorned cantaloupes might be wild and dangerous in a herd, but they were mighty fine eating when they were caught. To find out what eventually became of these critters, you must read this delightful folk tale of the Moderately Old West. To add to its wonder and charm, The Tale of the Pronghorned Cantaloupe is fully bilingual – English-Spanish, translated by its illustrator, Noel Dora Chilton, whose forty-eight splendid illustrations enrich the text. Ages 5-Adult — Reading New Mexico


Refreshing new topic emerges on BBQ book scene: Starting a BBQ Team

By Doug Mosley
It’s always refreshing to see something new and different from the rest—an original idea or a different take, sometimes even something just a little bit out of the ordinary. I’ve been writing this review column for nearly a decade and I’ve enjoyed the privilege of reading many great books about barbeque. Yet, I’ve never come across a book anything at all like Startin’ the Fire: Everything You Need to Know about Starting a Competition BBQ Team (Except the Recipes) by George Hensler ($12.99, Rio Grande Books, 102 pp.) I’ve seen great books on how to cook barbeque, I’ve seen many excellent books on great places that serve barbeque, and I’ve seen a couple of books about barbeque competitions. But a how-to on starting a competition barbeque team? Nope, not until now.
To the credit of Hensler, he is upfront with his readers about how this book came about. He admitted right away that this doesn’t come from decades of experience on the competition barbeque circuit but rather is drawn off his skills as an organizer and a planner. And judging from what he included in this book, this is a guy who got it right away.
Hensler included a couple of bonuses in his book. The first is all the barbeque team logos interspersed throughout the pages. Some you may know, some you may not. But you’re sure to enjoy the creativity and, who knows? It may inspire a new logo for a team of your own. The second bonus is the playlists for different periods in a competition. Once you see these, I’m pretty sure you’ll be visiting iTunes to add these to your iPod. (Don’t make me explain iTunes and iPod to any of you!)--National Barbeque News


Startin’ The Fire: BBQer From Street Pens Book On Tasty Competition
By Lorrie Warfield
You might see some of the competitions on TV, teams hurrying to “plate” their dishes. For George Hensler it all began with a trip to the Bel Air BBQ Bash a couple years ago. He was attending the competition as a spectator and decided that competitive barbequing looked like it might be a good deal of fun. The team started out pretty innocently as a bunch of friends barbequing in the back yard but quickly turned into a full fledged BBQ team. When beginning competitive barbequing the team had to rely on the assistance of other teams to point them in the right directions as there was no printed information widely available at the time. Luckily although the barbequing is competitive most teams were willing to take a new team under their wing and show them the ropes. Their team out of Street, Md named “Who Are Those Guys?”, began competing under the Kansas City BBQ Society. The society lays out some of the ground rules for competition including; the types of barbequing meats, the double blind judging method, and contest rules. When beginning to barbeque competitively George Hensler searched for information on how to begin the team. He was unable to find any books to help so once the team got started he decided to write his book “Startin’ the Fire”. This book is an absolute necessity to anyone considering starting a BBQ team or someone just wanting to know more about BBQ teams. There are chapters including; building your team, selecting a cooker, and how to handle your first contest. There are also a wealth of stories intermingled into the text of events that have occurred. At the end of the book there is a glossary of BBQ terms so that even a newbie can understand what is being said. The book is available at Amazon.com along with other book retailers, including www.startinthefire.com. “Startin’ The Fire” will also be available at a book signing event at Barnes and Noble in Bel Air, Md on June 12th. You can also find George Hensler and the rest of the “Who Are Those Guys” at www.thenewguys.blogspot.com/ or on their Facebook page. George also writes for a number of BBQ related publications including; National BBQ News and Smoke Signals. This year “Who Are Those Guy’s” will be at the competitions including; Bel Air BBQ Bash on August 13th & 14th and Salisbury, Md April 16th & 17th so come down and cheer this local team on. There are many ways to get involved in barbequing . You can become a judge through classes that are available throughout the year at various locations. You can be a contestant in the competitions and compete locally or travel the country. Or you can just be a spectator and enjoy the wonderful smells and flavors. -- The Daily Dagger

Startin' the Fire
by Eric Devlin
You know that guy at work that keeps asking you about BBQ? The one who has a secret sauce recipe passed down from his grandmother? The guy who is sure that if he entered a competition he would walk away with more trophies than the NY Yankees? He needs this book. He's annoying and a bit of a poseur, but Startin' the Fire will educate him on the comptetion experience very quickly. George Hensler is the pitmaster for the "Who Are Those Guys?" BBQ team. Fairly new to competing, George has chronicled his experience as on his blog (http://thenewguys.blogspot.com/). Startin' the Fire grew from those posts and is the first succinct and accessible introduction to competing that I have come across. George writes in a friendly and colloquial fashion with ancedotes that complements his advice.


Startin' the Fire
by Huck's Hut
Starting the fire is a book about everything you need to know about starting a competition bbq team except the recipes.When I got the book I was motivated to read due to the thickness(not thick at all) of the book. I spent a couple days checking out the art work on the front page and the back page with comments from Ray Lampe aka dr bbq, Rick Browne and Mike Stines . When I started reading this book, it became personal right away. First of all thanks to Al Gore for inventing the internet. George stated on a forum that he was writing a book and was looking for bbq pictures. Now I regret not sending our logo to make this book. My brother in law and I went to the contest in green lane, pa last year as spectators and we sat at the table at awards time with “Who Are Those Guys” (WATG) which we didn’t know at the time. After 4 top ten calls and a RGC we knew who those guys were. The book is very informative for people who plan to compete or for fans of pitmasters to know whats required to compete. As a comp bbq team we found this very valuable. This book will shortening the learning curve. From picking a name to team mates, bbq equip and the things needed compete, Transportion, box building practice were points that addressed. Resoures such as bbq forums, bbq books, equipment sources, review of kcbs rules,and bbq lingo. Reading this book could cause an addiction. But it will have you totally prepared for competition bbq. I am sure George would agree with me that he wish he had read this book before starting to compete. We think any one planing on or competing can gain valuable info from reading this book. George where are the recipes? I guess that’ll be in book 2.

We Didn't Start the Fire (But We Did Read the Book)
by BBQ Nation
Last week, we were fortunate enough to receive an advance copy of George Hensler's "Startin' the Fire," a book that will quickly emerge as the go-to resource for individuals looking to start their own competition barbecue teams.

For those of you who don't know George, he is the founding member of a team called Who Are Those Guys? and one of the friendliest folks out there on the competition circuit.

First, the basics. The book (MSRP $12.99 plus shipping) is a smallish paperback, perfect for stuffing in your back pocket as you feel your way through its step-by-step guide to competitive cooking. Over the book's 29 easy (and amusing) to read chapters, George covers off everything from selecting a team name and the proper equipment to invest in to equipment needs and food safety and shigging (the "theft" of cooking techniques from other teams during contests). George even includes a variety of team logos throughout the book including one that does not include a cartoon pig but instead involves a skull and crossed BBQ tools. And some smoke in da eye of the skull. Anyway, back to the book.

Early on, George tells the tale of one of his team's first and most favorite contests, New Holland Summerfest 2007. I mention this because that also happens to be when our team first met George and WATG? As George mentions, it was hotter than a whore on dollar night that weekend and everyone was struggling to get 6 categories completed and turned in a three-hour window while not passing out. We all survived and settled in to awards, not expecting much based on the critique our neighbor and good friend Jack McDavid had provided of our entries. But we sat anyway and were amazed to get a first place call in the first category, sausage. Soon they began calling results for chicken and when they got to third place we heard "WHO ARE THOSE GUYS?"

Well I sure as h#ll didn't know who those guys where but one of our friends Steve (aka Sledneck of R2BQ barbecue team) couldn't get over the name and soon we were all cheering their walk to the stage. We cheered so much, in fact, that I missed the fact that they called Smoke In Da Eye for second place in chicken and had to look at the trophy when I received it to even know what category it was for! WATG? went on to get a couple more calls that day, finishing an amazing third overall, and we have been friends ever since.

Yet while every existing competitor should read the book simply to experience the color way in which George shares so many of the experiences we have all had during our time on the circuit, this book was truly create as a bible for those just now looking to dip their foot in the barbecue sauce pond. As such, I asked my wife to read the book and provide her own take on it. Although she grew up minutes for the mega Memphis In May contest and has come to several of our competitions over the years, her experience has always been that of a spectator. So read on...

The ranks of competition grilling are about to get more crowded, thanks to George Hensler’s new book, Startin’ the Fire, which instructs the newbie team about all of the ins and outs of a competition. Nothing speaks like experience, and here George has been good enough to share all that he’s learned from running his award-winning team, “Who are Those Guys?”

The book covers what you would expect (keep your hands clean and your meat cool) to what you wouldn’t (avoid chafing, buy Gold Bond!). The novice shouldn’t hesitate to dive right into a competition as long as he keeps this invaluable reference book close at hand, which includes handy checklists and a glossary.

I was very impressed by the chapter about Box Building 101, which explains why putting lettuce in a Styrofoam container is surely one of the most maddening aspects of competing. George also shares some of the flavor of a real ‘que competition, recounting his highs, lows and battles with the unpredictable BBQ gremlins. What I loved most though was how he was able to convey his love of the sport and the camaraderie between all the teams. After reading this book, you’ll understand why he and so many others are completely hooked on this all-American sport.


September 7, 2009 -- ALBUQUERQUE JOURNAL FEATURES VISIONS UNDERGROUND
Deep, Dark Inspiration

By Kathaleen Roberts
Journal Staff Writer
          Mention Will Shuster's name, and most Santa Feans think museum murals and Zozobra.
        But the founder of Santa Fe's first modernist art group could claim yet another first. In 1924, Shuster was the first artist to enter Carlsbad Caverns and paint its inky splendors.
        "He rode the guano bucket down through the mine shaft and painted it by lantern light," Santa Fe's Lois Manno, the author of "Visions Underground: Carlsbad Caverns Through the Artist's Eye," (Rio Grande Books, Albuquerque, 2009, $19.99). A longtime caver, Manno will be at a book launch at Steve Elmore Indian Arts Gallery, 995 Paseo de Peralta, from 5-7 p.m. Friday. The gallery will also host a show of Shuster's Carlsbad Cavern paintings.
        Forever seeking new adventures, Shuster and fellow Cinco Pintores painter Walter Mruk heard about the exciting discovery of an underground world near Carlsbad and drove south to the cave. They found geologist Willis T. Lee encamped with his National Geographic entourage for several months of surveying and photography.
        The pair set up lanterns on the primitive trails, making sketches as models for larger works. Shuster produced at least eight large paintings and several oil sketches of Carlsbad. Much of Mruk's work dating to the period was lost or destroyed; no one knows how many paintings he produced, Manno said.
        Shuster would return to the caverns again in 1930 as part of a Works Projects Association mural contract. The murals have since disappeared, either destroyed by their maker or never finished, Manno said.
        Shuster later said, "The cave has made a cubist, vortivist and post-impressionist of me against my will."
        The seed for Manno's book project was planted in late 2005, when she approached the National Park Service about erecting an art exhibition on the caverns. The exhibit would showcase not only five paintings by Shuster, but 25 original prints by Ansel Adams. The great photographer came to the caves in 1935 and 1941 to photograph them for the Department of the Interior. But, incredibly, 25 signed prints lay forgotten in a superintendent's drawer until 1978.
        "The prints that were found in the file cabinet were found as a matter of cleaning house," Manno said. "They hadn't been displayed. They were sort of a hidden treasure."
        Adams hardly enjoyed his time in the cave. A master of natural light, he was forced to create his own via flash within Carlsbad's immutable darkness. "He asked (photographer Alfred) Stieglitz to pray for him because he was having such a hard time in the cave," Manno said.
        To communicate scale, Adams was forced to use models, another technique he abhorred, she added.
        "He wasn't really happy with any of" the prints, she said. Adams described one of the most challenging assignments of his photographic career by comparing the cave to working inside an "illuminated stomach."
        The results, intended to hang on Interior Department offices in Washington, D.C., to promote conservation, never made their destination, thanks to World War II, she said.
        A volunteer at Carlsbad for 15 years, Manno had heard rumors swirling about an Adams connection back in the '90s. Mounted on board, the prints are signed in pencil and have been authenticated by the Adams estate.
        The cave has lured working artists for decades, ranging from modernists like New Mexico's Raymond Jonson, who produced a trilogy of oils on canvas, to Japanese woodcut artist Toshi Yoshida.
        The cave's allure continues; Carlsbad chief of interpretation and education Marie Marek says she fields "dozens" of special use permits for photographers annually, as well as about half a dozen visual artists requests.
        "It is almost like being on another planet," she said, "kind of otherworldy. Where else do you see these fantastic rock formations and the amount of time it takes to form them — hundreds of thousands of years? And you have to create your own light, which drove Ansel Adams crazy."
        If you go
        WHAT: Book signing of "Visions Underground: Carlsbad Caverns through the Artist's Eye" by Lois Manno (Rio Grande Books, Albuquerque) and a show of Will Shuster's Carlsbad Cavern paintings.
        WHERE: Steve Elmore Indian Arts Gallery, 839 Paseo de Peralta.
CORRECTED ADDRESS
        WHEN: Reception 5-7 p.m. Friday. Through Sept. 25.
        CONTACT: 995-9677


September 6, 2009 -- ABQ JOURNAL REVIEWS THREE DOG NIGHT
Mescal and prize roosters simply do not mix
In this humorous tale, you'll meet Juan the Coyote, his girlfriend, Maria, and his cousin Manuelito, who writes that he will be visiting their village of Los Alamitos. Manuelito says he's coming on business, but Juan thinks there's an ulterior motive. After all, he hasn't seen his city cousin in years. And Juan, a reformed trickster — he guards sheep — wonders if Manuelito is leading an honest life. The three meet in the cantina where Maria works. Manuelito, dressed to the nines, says he sells sombreros. He's wearing a white hat over a smart pinstriped suit. The cousins get wasted on shots of mescal. Manuelito suggests, "Let's raise some hell." Juan knows better, but gives in. Their partying moves to Maria's chicken coop, where Manuelito eyes the rooster, the same prized rooster that Maria was planning to sell to raise money for her wedding to Juan. Against Juan's advice, Manuelito snatches the rooster and flees. Chasing him, Juan thinks he can fix the problem. But the rooster is dead before he can return it. Rather than reveal the surprising developments, readers should find out for themselves. Besides the issue of excessive alcoholic consumption, the inclusion of swear words in English and Spanish make this is a story for adults. There's a glossary of Spanish usage. The cautionary tale ends with the aphorism, "... sometimes chicken, sometimes feathers." That means something if you read the ending. A few misspellings and an incorrect glossary listing will slow readers, but not enough to dim the pleasure of the story told by Cheryl Montoya and illustrated by Jerry Montoya, both of Grants. -- Albuquerque Journal, September 6, 2009

August 17, 2009 -- SACRED FEMININE REVIEWED BY TODAY'S BOOKS
Santeros religious artists in Spanish Colonial era created Santos, icons of the saints, centerpieces of Catholic family altars and focus of community celebrations. Included in this quarter-millennium pre-Anglo creative output were Cult of Mary expressions and homages to other female saints. Today’s Books puts Sacred Feminine on the “A-List!” -- Today's Books, August 17, 2009






August 17, 2009 -- COOKING WITH LAVENDER FEATURED IN MIDWEST BOOK REVIEWS
Lavender is a lovely flower, as well as key ingredient for perfumes and scented soaps. What most people are not aware of is that lavender is also a plant that Spanish settlers first brought to the Americas and has a great many culinary uses as well! That's what makes Suzanne Smith's "Cooking With Lavender" such a unique compendium of recipes that incorporate lavender among the ingredients for a wide range of main and side dishes, beverages, butters, sweets, rubs, and herbal mixtures. From Lavender-Fried Apples; Red Raspberry-Lavender Soup; and Lavender Lemonade; to Grilled Marinated Filets Mignons on Lavender Foil Bread; Broiled Salmon with Lavender Champagne Sauce; and Lavender Shortbread Cookies, "Cooking With Lavender" is a unique addition to personal and community library cookbook collections -- and a lot of fun to browse while seeking novel dishes to embellish any mealtime occasion! -- MidWest Book Reviews, August 2009

July 26, 2009 -- ALBUQUERQUE JOURNAL FEATURES VISIONS UNDERGROUND
Manno, a Santa Fe resident, wrote the just-published book "Visions Underground — Carlsbad Caverns Through the Artist's Eye."
In this case, think of "artist" collectively, because there were a number of artists' eyes. People like famous photographer Ansel Adams and artist Will Shuster.
This intriguing and entertaining book covers the history of those who have been inspired to explore Carlsbad Caverns National Park with paintbrush and camera. The book grew out of the extensive research Manno, a Santa Fe resident, did on the Caverns Art Project.
When the Park Service decided in 2005 to renovate the park's Visitors Center, she offered to help coordinate an exhibit of its art and photography collection.
"Little did I know that they would have a problem with budgeting for new exhibits, so John Benjamin, the superintendent of the park, took my proposal and ran with it," Manno recalled. "He said we want to dedicate a space in the new visitors' center for a permanent gallery."
The project moved forward with Manno working in harness with the Park Service on research. She located several works that belonged to the caverns but were in storage in other states, including 25 original prints that Adams made in the caverns in 1936.
"What got me excited (about the project) was that the Ansel Adams prints were never exhibited at the caverns, and that I learned that Santa Fe artist Will Shuster was the first artist to go into the cave in 1924 and did a series of large and small paintings," Manno said.
Shuster's cave artwork was last displayed at the caverns back in 1925; it's been in storage since, she said.
Manno's legwork didn't stop there. She noticed that the Shuster art and the Adams prints needed conservation. Manno wrote grants to obtain funds for conservation, framing and mounting as well as having all the images in the park's collection documented. Manno brought in a consultant from the Museum of New Mexico, Jamie Hascall, who designed special sealing frames for the Adams prints. "When we got to the point where the exhibit was ready to have all the work hung, the lighting installed, we consulted with him so that everything met museum standards," she said.
The exhibit opened last October at the Visitors Center. Manno, a graphic artist, has been a caver for 30 years and a volunteer at the caverns for 15 years.


July 5, 2009 -- ALBUQUERQUE JOURNAL REVIEWS FEATURES OLD WEST TRIVIA BOOK
        Old West trivia book revels in minutiae about the good, the bad and the ugly of life on the frontier.
        New Mexico is prominent among the states referenced in Don Bullis' Old West trivia quiz book, and as one might expect there's a heavy dose of Billy the Kid and Sheriff Pat Garrett here.
        In fact, the very first question in the opening chapter ("Lawmen and Other White Hat Guys") is about Garrett: "Who was the one-time sheriff of Lincoln County, New Mexico, in 1881-1882? He unsuccessfully ran for Territorial Legislature in 1882."
        A few pages later, Garrett's name pops up again in the question about the name of the famous outlaw who Perfecto Armijo, sheriff of Bernalillo County, arrested months before Garrett did. The answer says Armijo nabbed Billy the Kid for an unspecified offense.
        And here's Garrett again on page 6 in questions about the name of the Doña Ana County sheriff from 1896 to 1900, about how Garrett died, and who confessed to killing Garrett.
        And Q-and-As over several pages in the next chapter, "Outlaws and Other Black Hat Guys," are about The Kid.
        Bullis' book covers hundreds of other famous and infamous individuals from the Old West in chapters on soldiers, Indians, cowboys, cattlemen, politicians, women and literature. There's a newly added chapter on "Movies and Television of the Old West."
        You'll find Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid's Wild Bunch, Buffalo Bill Cody, Wyatt Earp, Annie Oakley, Po' Pay, the Goodnight-Loving Trail, Bill Pickett, the black cowboy who invented the rodeo event of bulldogging, and the answer to the question "What is the origin of the term 'buckaroo?' " Answer: The Spanish word vaquero, which means cowboy.
        This is the second edition of a popular book that was first published in 1993. Bullis is a resident of Rio Rancho.
        Billy the Kid also is the answer to a movie question: What real-life person was portrayed in film by at least 20-plus actors (among them Emilio Estevez, Roy Rogers, Paul Newman and Kris Kristofferson)?
        Maybe the book will spawn an Old West Trivia board game. – Albuquerque Journal, July 5, 2009

June 20, 2009 -- NSS NEWS FEATURES VISIONS UNDERGROUND
Drawing on her experience as a caver, an artist, a past director of the National Speleological Society’s Fine Arts Salon, and director of the Carlsbad Caverns Art Exhibit/Cavern Arts Project, Lois Manno provides an interesting and informative historical overview of art and photography at Carlsbad Caverns. The breathtaking underground chambers of Carlsbad Caverns have long been an inspiration to artists and photographers; and artistic endeavors—from the first tentative stirrings of underground photography to more recent National Park Service Artist-In-Residence programs—are an integral part of the cave’s colorful history. In drawing public attention to the grandeur of Carlsbad’s vast underground labyrinth, the efforts of early artists helped to usher in a period of national awareness of subterranean worlds. Ultimately, this proved to be instrumental in helping to establish the cave and surrounding land as a National Monument in 1923 and a National Park in 1930. The park was declared a World Heritage Site in 1995.

Manno has compiled over 140 contemporary and historical images of Carlsbad Caverns and associated caves (e.g., Lechuguilla) for this beautifully illustrated book. In addition to a host of photographs taken deep within the cave, a rich array of spectacular illustrations—ranging in style from photo-realistic representations to abstract designs—captures the ethereal beauty of underground Carlsbad. Many of the early artists discussed in the book were hardly known outside of a select community. And yet, working in relative obscurity, they created some of the most endearing artistic masterpieces of Carlsbad Caverns that have ever been produced. Others, such as renowned photographer Ansel Adams, enjoyed international acclaim. However, all of them struggled to maintain their creative vision when faced with the foreboding and pervasive darkness of the cave. Portrayed in a variety of media, images of Carlsbad have steadily evolved over the past 100 years, shaped not only by advances in available technology but also as an adjustment to how these images were actually utilized. As Manno so clearly describes, however, what has remained largely unchanged over the intervening years is the creative inspiration that the cave continues to evoke in the eyes of artists and photographers.

In this singularly interesting account of speleohistory, Manno does an excellent job capturing the ever-changing flavor of underground art, particularly as it unfolded at Carlsbad Caverns National Park. In placing modern-day cave art into an historical context, she provides an interesting perspective on both caves and the creative spark that resides within the artist’s mind.

In the book’s final chapters, the work of more contemporary cave photographers and speleoartists is showcased. These featured artists are all well known within the caving community for their unparalleled skill and expertise in capturing the otherworldly magnificence not only of Carlsbad Caverns National Park, but of underground passages in cave systems worldwide. Many of these prominent artists and photographers have written books themselves, detailing aspects of their own particular creative genius.

While artists and photographers alike may find many wonderful ideas buried among these pages, it should be noted that this book is not an instructional guide to either cave photography or the creation of speleoart. Cave photographers will not find recommendations for underground lighting and exposure techniques. On the other hand, general-interest readers will not be bogged down by complicated discussions of F-stops, guide numbers, and megapixels. Furthermore, the book is not meant to be a comprehensive pictorial anthology of Carlsbad Caverns. Rather, it offers only an infinitesimal sample of the captivating world of cave art…past and present. Readers interested in instructional material on underground photography and speleoart or in the collected works of select artists are encouraged to consult some of the many references provided.

Visions Underground is a well-written and easily read book that will appeal to a wide audience. General readers as well as artists, photographers, and cave historians will all find something of interest here. In fleshing out this historical portrait of a century of creative expression at Carlsbad Caverns, Manno offers readers a rarely glimpsed vision of subterranean art and culture.


June 12, 2009 -- NM BREEZE FEATURES VISIONS UNDERGROUND
Lois Manno’s wonderful new book, Visions Underground: Carlsbad Caverns through the Artist’s Eye, is a ground-breaking look at cave art; but not the type of cave art discovered scratched or painted in Paleolithic caves around the world. She explores the natural art of the cave itself, gradually made by geological forces over eons and then portrayed by artists in different media over the past 100 years.

One version of the discovery of Carlsbad Caverns in the late 1880 has 16-year-old Jim White riding his horse on the range one evening. He notices a black cloud emerging from a hole in the ground. The black cloud is millions of bats leaving their underground roost to look for an evening meal of mosquitoes and bugs. A few years later, rich deposits of bat guano were discovered in the cave and mining commenced from deposits that reached 100 feet thick.

Over the decades, White explored the depths of the cave and spent hours building trails. By 1922, he hired a local photographer to promote his discoveries. In no time (October 1923), the speleological wonder became the Carlsbad National Monument.
The next year, Santa Fe artists Will Shuster and Walter Mruk were lowered into the cave by a winch-driven guano bucket. They became the first artists to paint the spectacular underground wonders—several color illustrations in Visions Underground feature Shuster’s works.

The two painters were only the first of many artists to follow. Famous photographer Ansel Adams struggled in the 1930s and early ‘40s to photograph the interior of the caverns, using the clumsy equipment of the day. Twenty-five of Adam’s signed photographic prints of the cavern were somehow misplaced over the years. They wound up in an unlocked storage cabinet until they were rediscovered in 1978. After being conserved and framed, several of his photos are now on display at the visitor center.

The previously-unpublished Adams photos in Visions Underground were directly scanned from the original photos. Other high-quality images (140 in all) range from drawings to black-and-white photos to the first color photos ever taken underground. Modern paintings, photographs an sculpture round out the book.

If you’ve never been to Carlsbad Caverns, you’ll certainly want to plumb its depths after poring over the surreal images of cave pearls, cave popcorn, massive formations and surreal helictites. And if you have been to Carlsbad Caverns, you’ll want to go back again. Lois Manno is a fine artist and graphic artist. A caver for thirty years and armed with a degree in fine arts, she is a founding member of the National Speleological Society Fine Arts Salon and a Fellow of the National Speleological Society. She curated and exhibited Carlbad Cavern’s photography and fine art collection. She also helped plan and develop the new, permanent gallery in the Carlsbad Caverns visitor center.

Visions Underground is well-researched, well-written, well-illustrated and can be summed up in one word: “Wow!” — New Mexico Breeze, June 12, 2009



June 4, 2009 -- MIDWEST BOOK REVIEWS FEATURES VISIONS UNDERGROUND
When one thinks about natural beauty, one thinks of pristine green fields. But there is beauty in darker areas as well. "Visions Underground: Carlsbad Caverns Through the Artist's Eye" photographically and artistically chronicles an artist's journey through the Carlsbad Caverns, a simply beautiful series of caverns in New Mexico. Combining painting with photography, "Visions Underground" is a visual treat and fine coffee table book. – MidWest Book Review, June 2009





June 4, 2009 -- MIDWEST BOOK REVIEWS FEATURES OLD WEST TRIVIA BOOK
Newspaper editor and deputy sheriff Don Bullis presents The New & Completely Revised Old West Trivia Book, a great source for trivia games or simple browsing. Presented in a question-and-answer format, with questions grouped in chapters by subject, the trivia ranges in topic from lawmen and outlaws, to Indians of the West and their chiefs, to wagon trains, boomtowns, women of the Old West, literature and art of the Old West, moves of the West, and much more. Now packed with even more fascinating facts than the first edition, The New & Completely Revised Old West Trivia Book is highly recommended to Western trivia buffs. "Q: What was Geronimo's real name? A: Three different sources give it three different spellings: Gokhlayeh, Goyathlay and Goyalka. One source says it translates as 'the yawner'." – MidWest Book Reviews, June 2009


June 3, 2009 -- LOCAL IQ FEATURES THE WHOLE DAMNED WORLD
Here is a great example of collaboration between a university and private enterprise. Yes, the book is expensive because of a limited press run, and it's really designed for readers affiliated in some way with New Mexico State University, but it is nevertheless a great story. Daniel B. Jett, dean of the School of Engineering from 1938 to 1947, corresponded with NMSU students from all around the world serving in the military during WWII. Jett was beloved by his students and their letters back to him reveal an intimate side of WWII not often seen. Illustrated with black-and-white photos that enhance the narrative, the book is simultaneously joyous and horrific. This is a superb historical account of NMSU, and I gave it a "B+." -- Local IQ, June 3, 2009


May, 15, 2009 -- BALLOON SAFETY SEMINARS REVIEWED IN MAJOR BALLOONING MAGAZINE
"Balloon Safety Seminars is not light bedside reading. It is a compilation of seminar subjects and accident reconstructions all with one common theme, safety. It is not a book to be read in the common sense, i.e., from front to back cover. Instead it is, like its author, an educational resource. Pick a subject of interest, find the chapter that discusses it, then read and learn. ... any balloon club or other group of aeronauts could easily use this guide to create a quality safety seminar." -- Ballooning, May/June 2009


April 15, 2009 -- MIDWEST BOOK REVIEW FEATURES THE WHOLE DAMNED WORLD
The Whole Damned World: New Mexico Aggies at War: 1941-1945 collects the World War II written correspondence between Daniel B. Jett, the Dean of Engineering at the New Mexico College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts (later NMSU) from 1938 to 1947, and hundreds of his former students serving the nation overseas and stateside during the war effort. Daniel "Dad" Jett composed class newsletters in addition to writing scores of letters; his enthusiasm helped raise morale among soldiers and nurses, as well as those helping the school during difficult times. Many of the letters reveal nostalgia for college days, and hope for returning to the school after the close of the war. A handful of black-and-white photographs illustrate this revealing and emotionally moving correspondence collection. -- MidWest Book Review, April 2009


MARCH 11, 2009 -- NEW MEXICO MAGAZINE FEATURES GENIZARIO & THE ARTIST
Although Georgia O’Keeffe is one of New Mexico’s most frequently chronicled residents, rarely do we read about the iconic painter from the perspective offered in The Genizaro & The Artist. Written by Napoleon Garcia, an Abiqiui native and genizaro (a person who claims both Colonial Spanish and Native American heritage), this slender volume relates Garcia’s memories of his interactions with the artist—he did odd jobs for her, and worked as her chauffeur. He writes, “I want to tell the story of our village and how we accepted this world famous artist into our way of living. She became a ‘villager’ here. She respected our way of life and had no desire to change us as so many outsiders want to do.” This is a poignant book about a hardworking man, a simple northern New Mexico village, and the iconic artist who left her mark on them. -- New Mexico Magazine, April 2009

MARCH 1, 2009 -- READING NEW MEXICO FEATURES MARTINEZTOWN
An impressively researched study, ... I found the book both frustrating and interesting. The frustrating part is that one would have to have a good mental picture of the Martineztown neighborhood to be able to make sense out of the many property transactions which are listed . ... What was most interesting to me about the book was the way the authors were able to peel back so many layers of property development to the early beginnings of settlement; What has been regarded by many people as a lower-class blighted inner city area near the “Big I,” the interchange of Interstate Highways 40 & 25, is treated with respect for its history and inhabitants. The authors conclude their study by urging intelligent city planning not only to preserve the neighborhood but also to heal the wounds of the past. -- Reading New Mexico, March, 2009

MARCH 1, 2009 -- READING NEW MEXICO FEATURES NEW MEXICO POLITICIANS
Author Don Bullis is well known for the depth of his knowledge and research regarding New Mexico history, law enforcement, and politics. In New Mexico & Politicians of the Past, he gathers together some of the state’s lesser known politicos and provides a short vignette of each man’s life (there are no women included in this collection, which is more likely due to the fact that women were not allowed to be part of politics in the past and not a case of the author’s chauvinism). The period represented is from the 1500s to the early 20th century.
Bullis made some rather interesting choices as to who was included in the book. Several of the snippets, such as those which relate farcical political fiascos and shady associations, are quite entertaining. Many give the reader a glimpse into a past era where garnering political position based purely on return favors and personal relationships was the norm.
For those who are truly addicted to New Mexico’s political history, this book will certainly be entertaining. It cannot be argued that Bullis knows his history and has done extensive research. I, for one, however, would have liked the selection of biographies to be just a bit more stimulating and exciting
-- Reading New Mexico, March, 2009


MARCH 1, 2009 -- READING NEW MEXICO FEATURES THE WHOLE DAMNED WORLD
The Whole Damned World is the first book to receive ReadingNewMexico.com’s Caliente Award for outstanding books. The award, given only occasionally, goes to a book that the reviewer and editor consider “hot” – a must have for libraries and a must read for the public.
"As a narrative, The Whole Damned World is compelling with a variety of characters and plot twists guaranteed to keep the reader engrossed. As a history, it’s fully footnoted with several appendices including a timeline and a full listing of all those from A&M who served, including their fates. It also includes a comprehensive index. As a photo album, it makes the people and events come alive.
So why did ReadingNewMexico.com award this book the Caliente Award? Because it makes history compelling, real, and readable. It gives faces to those who served and captures a history that fewer and fewer remember as time goes on. In my opinion, this book should be required reading in history classes at every high school and college, not just in New Mexico, but across the world. And every library – especially every New Mexico library – should have it as part of their collection so that we never forget.
Kudos to Martha Shipman Andrews and New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, for recognizing the treasure they held in their hands. And kudos to Rio Grande Books for giving Dean Jett’s story and impact the setting it deserved. -- Reading New Mexico, March, 2009


JANUARY 25, 2009 -- ALBUQUERQUE JOURNAL FEATURES BIOGRAPHICAL DICTIONARY VOL. II
With the publication of this second volume of a biographical dictionary of New Mexicans, Don Bullis of Rio Rancho adds to our understanding of the people who helped make our history. As with the 600-plus entries in first volume, the entries here are also listed alphabetically. That's a drawback for readers who want to place these biographies chronologically, to see who might have known whom. There is a separate timeline near the back of the book, but it is unrelated to the 400-plus biographical sketches in the front. The timeline, strangely, begins in 9500 B.C. and winds up forward of 1980 — on Feb. 23, 2008. That date is noteworthy to Bullis because it was the last day the Albuquerque Tribune published. Even without a less-than-helpful timeline, readers will have to scamper through the pages to connect the lives of historical figures. Frankly, readers should probably take the book for what it is and drop in to learn about the lives of individuals who strike their fancy. There are probably many biographies of interest, people who at least marginally made names for themselves at some point over the centuries. Volume II's opening sketch is of noted author/environmentalist Ed Abbey. He wrote the cult novel "The Monkey Wrench Gang" (1975), which had the reputation for providing the philosophical underpinnings for those taking to the extreme their support of the environment. Abbey's earlier book "The Brave Cowboy" was turned into the film "Lonely Are the Brave," which was shot in New Mexico. The last entry is of John K. Zollinger, who bought the Gallup Independent newspaper and expanded its coverage to various neighboring Indian reservations. In between you'll find actors (Angie Torres), architects (Isaac Rapp), athletes (Nancy Lopez), business people (Millie Santillanes), activists (Alice Faye Kent Hoppes), crime victims (Cricket Coogler), criminals and outlaws (Bonnie and Clyde), educators (Frank Angel), governors (Tom Bolack), first ladies (Clara Melendrez Apodaca) and politicians (Emilio Naranjo). Bullis throws a wide net in his attempt to be all-inclusive. -- David Steinberg, Albuquerque Journal, January 25, 2009



DECEMBER 16, 2008 -- NEW MEXICO MAGAZINE REVIEWS NEW MEXICO IN 1801
The title says it all: For this collection, author Rick Hendricks gathered and translated 26 reports written about New Mexico in 1801 by the territory’s Roman Catholic clergy. In that year, the Consulado (Merchant Guild) of Guadalajara requested that the priests send information about the “state and circumstances of agriculture, industry, and commerce” in the New Mexico territory, with the hope that they could use the data to foster economic growth. The result is an intimate view of the territory, from the status of the roads to the clash between the Spanish and Pueblo cultures. The reports, which Hendricks admits that he has translated for historical accuracy rather than for ease of reading, are for the serious student of history who wants to consult primary (or nearly so) sources.
Hendricks, the author or co-author of 16 books, was an editor for the Vargas Project, a historical editing project dedicated to publishing the official papers of Governor Don Diego de Vargas (1643-1704). He currently works in the Archives and Special Collections Department at New Mexico State University, where he also teaches Latin American history. – New Mexico Magazine, January 2009


NOVEMBER 13, 2008 -- MIDWEST BOOK REVIEWS REVIEWS FRANK APPLEGATE
To truly be able to appreciate works of great art and the circumstances within which they were created require a knowledge and understanding of the life and times of the artists that create them. In "Frank Applegate of Santa Fe: Artist & Preservationist" students of this southwestern artist will be delighted with this elegantly written, carefully researched, informed and informative study. Co-authors Daria Labinsky and Stan Hieronymus bring a beautifully designed, profusely illustrated, and superbly presented compendium showcasing the life and works of Frank Applegate and his influence. Stan Hieronymus focuses upon Applegate's personal family history to life writing with an especial authority as his own father was Frank Applegate's nephew. Accessible written, and displayed with photos of family and Applegate's works of art (some of which have become well known nationally), "Frank Applegate of Santa Fe Artist & Preservationist" has been awarded the Southwest Book Award and is a valued contribution for personal, academic, and community library 20th Century American Regional Art reference collections and supplemental reading lists. -- MidWest Book Reviews

SEPTEMBER 1, 2008 -- READING NEW MEXICO FEATURES OUR FAVORITE RECIPES
Our Favorite Recipes is a beautiful book – it includes full-page photos of each recipe as well as a photo and short bio for each cook who contributed a recipe. The layout is very nice – the cover includes a folded front piece which can be used to mark the pages, making it user friendly.
As a former New Mexico resident and someone who loves to cook, I was a bit disappointed in the book’s offerings. I am always keen to find new recipes, and particularly those which feature what I consider “traditional” New Mexican cuisine.
Our Favorite Recipes contains a rather surprising collection of dishes – from “Veggie Sushi” to “Lemon Pie”. But if you are seeking recipes with the state’s famous chiles, or even nouveau Southwestern cuisine, this book does not deliver. I have to wonder what “Ragin’ Gator Etoufee”, “Fettuccine Alfredo with Chicken” or “Chicken and Shrimp Curry” are doing in a cookbook which is associated with New Mexico. That said, there are a few recipes which seem to better represent the state, such as “Tortilla Soup Monte Vista Style” and “Chile Braised Lamb Shanks”. I know the first one I’ll be trying is the “Betty Rancho Burger” – a hamburger on French bread placed on a bed of beans, potatoes, cheese and green chile sauce (almost like a Navajo taco). Yum! -- www.readingnewmexico.com



SEPTEMBER 1, 2008 -- READING NEW MEXICO FEATURES BIOGRAPHICAL DICTIONARY VOL. II
Although I am not familiar with Volume I of Bullis’ work, this is no hindrance to appreciating the contents of Volume II. It is laid out in a simple way, the entries are alphabetical, and the photo portraits add much to the biographical sketches of the subjects. Reading about the lives of people who made New Mexico their home, and in many cases personal project, is quite the most interesting way to learn about New Mexico history and culture.
Having lived here some 30-plus years now, the occasional entry weaves into my own life. I heard Linda Cotton’s fabulous singing voice more than once, and what an untimely death at age 55. I didn’t know my divorce attorney, Patsy Reinard of Socorro had died, or that she was the first woman lawyer to open a practice there.
Some of the juxtapositions of the entries are quite interesting: witness reclusive novelist Cormac McCarthy (still living) next to poor little Charley McComas, victim of the Apache Wars of the late 1870’s.  The mysterious Lozen, sister of the great Apache chief Victorio, is two entries from Nancy Lopez, professional golfer, and adjacent to Abad Leroy Lucero, award-winning woodworker.
Rancher and former New Mexico Governor Bruce King, rancher and oilman Robert O. Anderson, and rancher, World War II veteran, and State Senator Floyd W. Lee are examples of those who made New Mexico their lifelong project. Anderson endowed the University of New Mexico Schools of Management, and was said to be one of the largest individual landowners in the U.S., with holdings of about one million acres in the southeast part of the state. His photo shows him in a fishing vest, I believe, and joking with the photographer. Handsome rascal. Wish I had met him, and I just missed, because he died in December of 2007. Floyd W. Lee, born in Albuquerque, returned from the World War II European theater to run a ranch near Mt. Taylor, and served as State Senator for 12 years. Bruce King we are all familiar with, and I assume his biography is in Volume I because I don’t see him in Volume II, although I do see his wife, Alice Martin King.
Everyone needed to make up the full complement of talents in a great and diverse state, is here: lawyers, judges, artists, scientists, World War II veterans, woodworkers, playwrights, ranchers, educators; New Mexico natives, others who arrived from elsewhere, and let’s not forget the occasional Hollywood star. Dan Blocker taught school in Carlsbad, New Mexico in the 1950’s before his success on television’s Bonanza playing "Hoss" Cartwright.
It is impossible for me to read these entries without imagining these people’s lives against the backdrop of the vast and wonderful land of New Mexico. The geography of this land, being of the special – enchanted – kind, makes it possible for the subjects of these biographies (and ourselves) to live life as art. Just as the artists and photographers came under the spell of the landscape, so did the woodcarvers express the land of their birth; and so did Floyd Lee take the land as his template when he returned from the war and took up sheep ranching, which necessarily soon morphed into cattle ranching, and his 12 years as State Senator.
The Timeline in the back is a natural complement to the thumbnail biographies, and the publisher thoughtfully provides a map identifying New Mexico’s counties, often referred to in the entries. The 14-page bibliography would keep any reader busy for a long time.
Covering everything from art to politics, this book has something different and interesting on every page; I can see why Volume I has garnered so many awards. It is a treasure of reference books, accessible, reader friendly, full of fascinating information. Indeed, I don’t see why it wouldn’t make good summer reading (winter, too, for that matter), especially for geeks like me who don’t care for trashy novels. -- www.readingnewmexico.com



SEPTEMBER 1, 2008 -- READING NEW MEXICO FEATURES THE STRANGER COMES AT SUNDOWN
For most of the last two years of her husband’s fifteen-year battle with Parkinson’s disease, Awalt kept a journal.  As a primary caregiver, she brings the reader into her concerns:  Will he wander away from the apartment during the night?  Will he manage to reach the toilet or will she have another major cleanup chore?  Will she be able to get him back into his bed when he falls out?  Over and over, she gives thanks for the washer and dryer in the apartment.  Over and over we hear about that Stranger who comes, frequently at sundown, to take over her husband’s personality, a Stranger who begins to act out violently.
During the final three months, when she knows she can no longer continue to care for him herself, Awalt goes daily to spend hours with him at the Medical Center.  This part of her journal kept me turning page after page to see what would happen next.  Written for other caregivers, Awalt makes her case clear for better communication between doctor and family members.  She spells out flags to watch for in other Parkinson’s patients.  One wonders what her husband’s last days would have been like without her presence in the Medical Center, in spite of the good care and extremely high costs of his treatment.
This reviewer wished for better editing.  The occasional wrong word should have been corrected.  Several unclear passages might have been reworked.  Some of the repetitiveness could have been eased.  But for all that, an insightful read. -- www.readingnewmexico.com



SEPTEMBER 1, 2008 -- READING NEW MEXICO FEATURES COOKING WITH LAVENDER
Close your eyes and picture this:
The mid afternoon sun warms the ground under your sandals.  Buzzing lazily, bees alight on purple lavender blossoms to sip succulent nectar. The air smells of roots and freshly watered earth.  Leaves rustle, and blossoms blur until they resemble an Impressionist painting.
Tell me as you stand in the garden--what is more wonderful than a field of lavender in August’s golden light?  Perhaps bringing lavender inside and cooking with it--tasting a moist pound cake flavored with lavender, and fresh from the oven. Perhaps enjoying the scent of chicken, rosemary, and lavender blending as they bake.
Sound exciting?  Then you might like to pick up a copy of Suzanne T. Smith’s Cooking with Lavender, published by Rio Grande Press in Albuquerque. This little specialty book offers a variety of recipes from Red Raspberry Lavender Soup, to Lavender Scrod in Foil, to Lavender and Apple Pound Cake.
Should you be new to using lavender for culinary purposes, don’t worry.  Cooking with Lavender will help you.  Besides a brief history of the plant, the introduction lists the types best for cooking, ways to use them; and a brief summary of how to grow, harvest, and store lavender, if you would like to try that. 
Ms. Smith lists her e-mail address and invites you to let her know how you like her recipes.  I assume that means she’ll also answer questions that you may have.
She suggests two places to buy culinary lavender.  Since it isn’t readily available in stores where I live, I called the establishments, but no one answered the phone at either of them.  One source offered a web site, but my cantankerous computer wouldn’t load it.
However I did locate enough lavender through friends to try the Apple Pound Cake and the New Potatoes with Lavender Chive Butter.  A novice with this plant, I followed Ms. Smith’s suggestions for using it. Each time, a delightful aroma swelled in my kitchen, and soon after that, a delicious taste filled my mouth.  No.  It filled my whole being.
I’ve always enjoyed cooking, so I had no trouble interpreting and following recipe directions in Cooking with Lavender   Comparing this title with two other New Mexico specialty cook books in my kitchen, I found it equal to them in range of recipes and tips for lavender use.
As soon as I locate a good source of culinary lavender, or someone answers the phone at the places Suzanne T. Smith suggested,  Cooking with Lavender will become as dog-eared and stained as the other culinary books in my kitchen, and lavender will take its place on my spice rack beside cumin, thyme, and coriander. -- www.readingnewmexico.com



SEPTEMBER 1, 2008 -- READING NEW MEXICO FEATURES NEW MEXICO IN 1801
There are different kinds of history books, reader-friendly like Don Bullis’ Biographical Dictionary (Volume II is reviewed on this website), suited to the general reading audience. Then there are the history books that are too much like the texts we groaned through in school.
New Mexico in 1801: The Priests Report is that kind of history book. Specifically, it is a primary source book, chiefly interesting to the academic historian, although not impossible for the general interest reader. The Merchant Guild of Guadalajara requested these reports: the 20 priests replied with formulaic letters describing conditions in 28 pueblos, or curacies. The Guild desired specific information about each pueblo: what was the state of agriculture in each curacy? What kinds of livestock were raised? What was the condition of the roads? In all, there were eight questions the priests were to address.
I won’t try to enumerate the answers to these questions, but like Don Bullis’ book, knowing the lands the priests are describing enriches the reader. When Father José de Vera of Taos writes of his mission “at the foot of a sierra and in a valley of the same name . . .” it is useful to picture for oneself hulking Taos Mountain and the great sweep of Taos valley.
Bit by bit, the text gives up information of interest. The census figures included in each report are a valuable contribution to what we know about Nuevo Mexico of the time. The figures are divided by gender and race, so we see how many men and women lived in the pueblos, and how many were Indians and how many non-Indians. These figures include the baptisms, marriages, and burials of 1801.
That the Spanish priests all learned to write in a formal manner, lacking the individual voice, can’t be helped. We have the occasional spark, “I would regret leaving in the inkwell . . .” (Father José Rubi of Santa Ana.) Or Father José Mariano Rosete on the bridge across the Rio Grande near his curacy at Santa Cruz, “In crossing it accidents often occur. . .there are no architects who understand bridges.” The frontier also had its hazards. At Abiquiu, Father José de la Prada complained of the Utes, “They go around like a gang of highwaymen . . .The damage this nation does is incredible.”
Hendricks’ introduction gives some valuable background, and his notes are quite helpful. He includes a glossary, and short biographies of the priests, some of whom were embroiled in almost telenovela style controversies (not related to the reports).
A little more interpretation would have been helpful. Hendricks does not place these reports in the context of the long occupation of Spain in the New World, or the coming independence of Mexico, 20 years in the future. He does not shy away from the race question, but he doesn’t have much to say about the state of the Indian mind that so frustrated the priests. The natives “applied themselves very little,” were very poor, and not willing to be taught, either. What conquered people willingly adopt the culture of those who have subjugated them?
The documents being in the Spanish voice give us no interpretation, none of the native point of view. However, historians will now be able to read between the lines of these primary source documents.
Hendricks successfully arranged punctuation and paragraphs, but I have a quarrel with how the book is formatted. For one, the text lacks quotation marks. For another, the formatting is misleading to the reader, making it difficult to distinguish when each priest’s report concludes and the next one begins. The Table of Contents is meant to make up for this deficiency, but it does not substitute for the appropriate use of heading fonts, white space, and quotation marks that would have smoothed the way for the reader. I can’t help but think Rick Hendricks’ painstaking work could have been better served.
New Mexico in 1801: The Priests Report is truly for the history specialist. I cannot imagine the difficulty of translating hand-written documents in 200-year-old Spanish, but this book adds to the understanding and interpretation of New Mexico when it was still a remote and impoverished province of New Spain. -- www.readingnewmexico.com



SEPTEMBER 1, 2008 -- READING NEW MEXICO FEATURES GENIZARIO & THE ARTIST
All good biographies and histories, whether sweeping in scope or minutely focused, rely on the stories of individuals to bring them to life. The Genizaro & the Artist delights the reader with both small, brightly polished details and larger pieces of history most likely unknown to the average New Mexican.
This thoughtful, gentle book contains the story of Napoleon Garcia, a Genizaro born and raised in Abiquiú, NM. As he and his coauthor Analinda Dunn explain, the Genizaros (a term long fallen out of use) were native peoples made slaves by the early Spanish settlers, then baptized into Christianity with the goal of eradicating all indigenous identity. According to the authors, the Genizaros “came from many of the nomadic tribes, such as the Navajo, Utes, Comanches, Kiowa, Pawnee, Apache, and other non-Pueblo Indians” who were in the area at the time of Spanish colonization. In later generations, these families intermarried with Spanish families.
Abiquiú is one of the best known of the Genizaro communities involved in the Spanish land grants of the mid-1700s. It is also known as the home of artist Georgia O’Keefe for 40 years, at the start of which time Garcia was a neighbor boy who ran errands for her. His reminiscences of Abiquiú, of Genizaro history and customs, of Ghost Ranch and curanderas, and of his interactions with the “artist lady” and her life in the community should interest not only historians and fans of Georgia O’Keefe but also sociologists, anthropologists, folklorists, and curious readers in general.
The two voices in The Genizaro & the Artist are those of Garcia (speaking in the first person) and Dunn (speaking in the third).  These friends create a sweet duet, reviving for us a world now gone and showing the strands that remain interwoven in the Abiquiú of today, where Garcia reigns as one of its elders and local characters. I recommend this slim volume for the gem-like stories, photos, insights, and generosity of spirit running through its deceptively straightforward narrative. -- www.readingnewmexico.com

Winner of the Twitchell History Award among other honors, Saints of the Pueblos is a wonderful testimony to the influence that the images of saints have upon Pueblo pottery traditions - a unique melding of Hispanic and Pueblo cultures. Each of the nineteen active pueblos is represented with a retablo as created by author Charlie Carrillo of its patron saint, in the style of the pueblo. Four additional, ancestral pueblos are also represented. The colorful imagery, interspersed with black-and-white photography and thoughtful text about the history of each pueblo and its art makes Saints of the Pueblos a distinguished, viscerally visual exploration of how Catholicism and Pueblo culture are inextricably interwoven. A welcome addition to Native American art studies shelves. -- Midwest Book Review, August 2008


AUGUST 25, 2008 -- MIDWEST BOOK REVIEWS FEATURES THE GENIZARIO & THE ARTIST
Part of the award-winning "Stories from New Mexico Villages" series, The Genizaro & the Artist: Stories from New Mexico Villages is the memoir of author Napoleon Garcia, a longtime Genizaro (individual who claims descent from both Colonial Spanish settlers and Native American tribes) resident of Abiquiu, New Mexico, who knew and worked for Georgia O'Keeffe during the forty years in which she called Abiquiu home. Though Garcia has been interviewed about O'Keeffe before, The Genizaro & the Artist tells in his own words, pace, and style (with help from his friend Analinda Dunn) what it was truly like to know a famous artist as a fellow villager. A handful of black-and-white photographs illustrate this testimony, especially recommended for anyone interested in a different, down-to-earth perspective on Georgia O'Keeffe. --
MidWest Book Reviews, August 2008



AUGUST 20, 2008 -- MIDWEST BOOK REVIEWS FEATURES OUR FAVORITE RECIPES
One of the most popular of the New Mexico regional publications is the 'Albuquerque' magazine. Housewives and homemakers particularly appreciated the recipes that were featured within its pages. Now Lexi Petronis (the magazine's editor-in-chief) has compiled a 96-page compendium of the best of those recipes and illustrated them with 142 color plates of the finished dishes and the chefs that prepared them. One especially nice feature is that each showcased recipe also features a miniature replica of the particular issue in which it appeared. The recipes themselves range from a Chipotle-Maple Marinated Pork Tenderloin; to a Child-Seared Salmon on Mango Salsa; to a Grilled Rosemary Chicken Breast Over Arugula with Roasted Red Peppers, Capers and Fresh Mozzarella; to a Betty Rancho Burger on French Bread. This impressive collection of gourmet quality, kitchen cook friendly, palate pleasing and appetite satisfying dishes would make an elegant and popular edition to any personal, professional, and community library cookbook collection! -- MidWest Book Reviews, August 2008


MAY 25, 2008 -- NEW MEXICO HISTORICAL REVIEW FEATURES VILLAGES & VILLAGERS
An enjoyable follow-up to his Memories of Cibola, Villages & Villagers takes one back to a time that no longer exists. Abe Pena's memories, interviews, and relationships have allowed him to put pen to paper and create these tiny glimpses of his life in San Mateo, New Mexico. Each section of the book melts smoothly into the next. ... The book makes one yearn for simpler times. Many folks who grew up in this area wil lenjoy reading this charming book. -- New Mexico Historical Review, Spring 2008


April 5, 2008 -- WESTERN WRITERS OF AMERICA ROUND-UP REVIEWS NEW MEXICO: A BIOGRAPHICAL DICTIONARY
This volume is a home-run for Bullis and the history of New Mexico. -- Round-Up Magazine, April 2008


FEBRUARY 24, 2008 -- NEW MEXICO HISTORICAL REVIEW FEATURES MEMORIES OF CIBOLA This collection of stories ... provides valuable historical insights into rural Hispanic life, especially in northewrn New Mexico. Memories of Cibola introduces the struggles, ambitions, faiths, triumphs, and failures of the remarkable people of these places. Although written in a genuine and folksy style it is not always easy to read. Like many historical sourcebook collections, it has n o smotth narrative flow. Though Memories of Cibola seems like a bit if stew, with a little of this and a little of that, it is a dish well worth sampling. The reader will be more than compensated for the difficuklties in the book by the value of the insights to be gained between its covers. -- New Mexico Historical Review, Winter 2008

February 15, 2008 -- NEW MEXICO MAGAZINE REVIEWS NEW MEXICO: A BIOGRAPHICAL DICTIONARY This volume will be a welcome first-step reference tool for students of New Mexico history -- New Mexico Magazine, March 2008

September 10, 2007 -- MIDWEST BOOKS REVIEWS FEATURES TAPESTRY OF KINSHIP A Tapestry of Kinship: The Web of Influence Among Escultores and Carpinteros in the Parish of Sante Fe, 1790-1860 is a close study of a type of religious art that emerged in New Mexico during the early nineteenth century. Four distinguished santeros of New Mexico's "golden age" of Spanish colonial art became sought-after masters of locally created artworks of faith and devotion. A Tapestry of Kinship particularly examines the kinship and social occupation connections between these artists and several families of carpenters, which worked to foment the surge of devotional creativity. A handful of inset color plates of artworks illustrate this meticulous and scholarly retracing of bloodlines as well as other means of interconnection amid faithful artists and carvers. -- Midwest Book Reviews, September 2007

August 25, 2007 -- KAYE TROUT'S BOOK REVIEWS AVENGING VICTORIO Avenging Victorio is indeed a fast-paced, fascinating, historical novel bound toentertain and educate at the same time. DeWitt's technique of telling this tale from two perspectives--the Apache's and the military--provides a truer sense of history and the cultures. As I live in the four-corners area just north of New Mexico, I personally enjoyed it immensely and highly recommend it to readers who enjoy historical western-type novels. Genre: Fiction/SW History. Rating: Excellent. -- Kaye Trout's Book Reviews, kayetrout.blogspot.com, August 21, 2007

August 23, 2007 -- TRUE WEST MAGAZINE REVIEWS AVENGING VICTORIO Colonel Edward Hatch, commanding the Military District of New Mexico Territory at Santa Fe, learns his constant harassment of the Apache war chief Victorio pays off south of the border. Mexican rifles wipe out the raider and his band October 15, 1880.В  But, another Apache chief decides on revenge. In just six weeks the reputedly decrepit Nana leads forty warriors across the Territory killing over fifty Americans.В  Then, an officer trailing Nana finds fifteen million in stolen gold in one of Victorio's mountain caches but is killed after informing the Colonel.В  Though planning on becoming the richest retired officer in the army, Hatch is finally forced to take to the field after Nana.В  Boarding a southbound military train he heads for Fort Selden.В  There, fate awaits him. News that Nana has vanished completely reaches Hatch, but he remains unaware of vengeful warriors who prepare to salute his coach with dynamite.В  This swiftly moving tale of death and revenge has long needed to be told. -- True West Magazine, October 2007

August 22, 2007 -- NEW MEXICO MAGAZINE REVIEWS AVENGING VICTORIO Fighting the Apaches is not like fighting the Mexicans or the Confederates, it's more like fighting ghosts,” assesses Col. Edward T. Hatch in Avenging Victorio. These comments by the wary officer reflect his frustration in the Army's inability to capture Nana, an Apache war chief who, in retaliation for the death of his fellow warrior, assailed the New Mexico territory in the late 1800s. Author Dave DeWitt effectively fictionalizes the events following the death of Victorio, an Apache war chief who rebelled against the impoverishment and, arguably, enslavement of his people. A newcomer to the historical fiction genre, DeWitt is renowned for his knowledge of chile peppers and has published more than 30 books, most of them cookbooks. Now the "Pope of Peppers" turns his attention to the fiery conflict between the territorial Army and the Apache tribe. DeWitt's storytelling weaves together the perspectives of the opposing sides, providing insight into the events of the period, and the personalities, motivations and cultural differences of the key players in the conflict. Thinking the Apache threat vanquished with Victorio's death, Col. Hatch (for whom the town of Hatch is named) struggles once again to appease the demands of his commanding officer and the governor, protect the citizens of the territory and assuage his wounded pride. Although Victorio's death is the initial impetus for the quest, the mission soon expands to retaliating for other warriors' deaths-such as Mangas Coloradas, protecting Apache rights and ensuring their survival. Nana and his warriors are cunning tacticians, using guerilla warfare to raid for supplies and kill as many "Blue Coats" as possible. DeWitt describes the ceremonial scenes and the relationships between characters with a clear dedication to authentically represent the culture. The dynamic narrative format builds suspense as the reader eagerly awaits the discovery of which strategies will ultimately accomplish each side's goal—defeating the enemy. DeWitt's characters sometimes display a prescience that can only be possible with today's knowledge, such as allusions to the town of Hatch becoming famous for chile and a young Apache's visions that his people would someday profit from gambling, These moments, however, create a kinship between a contemporary reader and the usually intangible characters of New Mexico's past.-- New Mexico Magazine, September 2007

AUGUST 10, 2007 -- MIDWEST BOOK REVIEWS FEATURES DAWSON JOURNAL Compiled and edited by Robert J. Torrez (State Historian at the New Mexico State Records Center and Archives in Santa Fe from 1987 until his retirement in December 2000), "New Mexico In 1876-1887: A Newspaperman's View" is a collection of travelogs and reports by William D. Dawson when he undertook a series of journeys that took him through New Mexico. He embarked upon the D&RG railroad near Fort Garland, Colorado and traveled through the Mesilla Valley, going west to the mining towns of Silver City and Pinos Altos, New Mexico. His reports were published in 'The Santa Fe Daily New Mexican' and provided his readers with informative eyewitness descriptions of New Mexico's towns, agriculture, wineries, mines, farmers, merchants, vintners, miners, soldiers, Native Americans, outlaws, and pretty girls. "New Mexico In 1876-1887" is a unique contribution to the growing body of literate on the 19th Century American West and is especially recommended for academic library American History reference collections in general, and New Mexico State History reading lists in particular.-- MidWest Book Reviews, August 2007

August, 2007 -- READERVIEWS.COM REVIEWS AVENGING VICTORIO Dave DeWitt’s “Avenging Victorio” is a simply splendid account of Apache insurgency in New Mexico in 1881. Although written as a novel, and therefore falling into the category of fiction, it gives the impression of standing firmly on its foundation of extensive research and extraordinary sensibility of the author for a quite sensitive situation. After the death of one of the great Apache chiefs, Victorio, the U.S. Army believes the Apaches to be completely defeated. The event is even celebrated under the thin guise of a Governor’s Christmas party, where the official hostess is no other than Evelyn Hatch, wife of Colonel Edward T. Hatch, former General in the great Civil War. The settlers in the New Mexico Territory expected the danger to be over, convinced that there is nobody strong enough to organize the Apaches again. Little did they know…. Nana, the 74-year-old war chief, takes on the task of avenging Victorio and, with his rag-tag group of warriors, sweeps through New Mexico in a series of guerilla warfare raids, killing civilians and evading the Cavalry as well as the legendary Buffalo Soldiers. The insurgency is a success, the battle is won – but we all know that the war was lost as far as the Indians were concerned. Dave DeWitt created engaging and believable characters on both sides of the conflict, showing their motivation and their beliefs. The parts of the book that truly surprised me and that turned out to be my favorites are those that deal with the customs and traditional ways of the Apaches. There are tales and legends and vivid descriptions of bathing and fighting and dancing…and courting and dreams… and even a hidden treasure. So the book that I expected to be just a historical novel about the early days of New Mexico turned into a well-rounded volume about fighters on both sides of the encounter as well as a very eye-opening read about the Apache culture and customs. I also greatly enjoyed the 16 photographs which wonderfully illustrated both the setting and the participants in this epic confrontation. Dave DeWitt’s “Avenging Victorio” is an enthralling book, which grabs you quickly and does not let go. If you are like me, your only disappointment will be that it ends too quickly. -- ReaderViews.com, August 2007

August 10, 2007 -- BellaOnline.com REVIEWS NAVAJO AND PUEBLO EARRINGS This book takes us back in history, to some early examples of Native women’s earrings, through using Robert V. Gallegos 350 piece unparalleled collection of historic Native American earrings. Through viewing the photos, one can see the progression of style, bringing us all the way up to the mid-century mark, and the introduction of silver as a medium. To be able to view the collection illustrated in this book is a true honor, and the knowledge of the subject brought to the book by author, scholar, and Southwestern jewelry collector Robert Bauver, really brings this collection to life. This is the first book of its kind, illustrating, and discussing the types of earrings and materials used, and giving the history of the largest collection of historic Native American earrings in existence. This book is a must for any collector, be it of Native American books, or Native jewelry, but it is also a very interesting history that is presented here, and as such, is a recommended read for anyone with any interest in Native history, or of the popular silver and turquoise earring styles of today. Props also to Rio Grande Books/LPD Press for the excellent job in presenting this book with it’s many illustrations. They have brought their own distinct style to the book, which makes it a very enjoyable read. -- BellaOnline, August 9, 2007

August 10, 2007 -- BellaOnline.com REVIEWS SAINTS OF THE PUEBLOS There are 19 pueblos scattered throughout New Mexico, each with its own culture and traditions. To put all of this history together into one book seems a monumental task, yet Dr. Charles M. Carillo has accomplished it with great finesse in his book, Saints of the Pueblos. This is no ordinary book. The concept behind it is phenomenal. The author first created authentically made Retablos for each pueblo, depicting their patron saint along with their symbols, as well as an example of the pottery created at the pueblo during the time of the Catholic missions. The design of each Retablo is reminiscent of the pueblo itself, and therefore, no two are alike. Retablos are wooden panels generally created by Hispanic artists that represent the saints. This artwork by itself demonstrates the combined history between the pueblos and the Spanish Catholics of New Mexico. Yet, Dr. Carrillo has taken it a step further. In the book, he discusses the saints of each pueblo, their pottery styles, the history of their missions, or churches, it’s saints and feast days, and gives a little history of the pueblo and it’s people. There are many illustrations of pottery, missions, historical sites, and even a map of the pueblos. The book also includes information on four abandoned pueblos that are now in ruins, the most notable of which are the three sites at Salinas Pueblo Missions National Monument. New Mexico is a conglomeration of people living together with a shared history, and nowhere is it more evident than in this book. Written to help to preserve pueblo history, it has done even more. It speaks of the mingling of spiritual forces that have brought the people of this state together, and still holds them together. It celebrates the life that continues in the pueblos, honoring that sharing of history. It demonstrates the artwork of the people of this region, bringing together Catholicism, and Native works. This book is valuable source for New Mexico Native history, as well as that of their Catholic counterparts. This book is published by LPD Press, right here in New Mexico, and they have done an outstanding job of presenting this work of art in book form. I highly recommend this book for its artwork, its history lessons, and for its sheer creativity and genius. I could offer no higher praise. -- BellaOnline.com, August 9, 2007

August 9, 2007 -- BellaOnline.com REVIEWS AVENGING VICTORIO New Mexico author Dave DeWitt, the founder of Chile Pepper magazine, has turned his hand to historical fiction, and has produced a riveting novel that traces the Apache insurgency in the New Mexico Territory in 1881, called “Avenging Victorio”. “Avenging Victorio” is an exciting novel that includes historical figures, Apache customs, and New Mexico events, all put together with a flair for action and adventure, and interesting characters. There’s Lew Wallace, the governor of the New Mexico territory who wrote Ben-Hur, General Hatch, for whom the famous chile town in New Mexico is named, Billy the Kid, Geronimo, Cochise, the Apache War Chief Nana, and of course, Victorio. Included in the book are familiar locations and battles, a glimpse into the past of Santa Fe and its famous Palace of the Governors, and the food that is legendary in this region. Dave DeWitt enthralls us with a tale that is at once fast paced, exciting, and full of interesting historical lore. A thoroughly engrossing tale, that winds around New Mexico like the Apaches who used to roam these lands, and embodies the true spirit of New Mexico culture. The story follows a leftover band of Apache warriors that includes women, children, and elders; they are all that remain of the Apaches that have escaped reservation life. These warriors fight back against the Ninth Calvary, raiding trains, and wreaking havoc on rail lines, telegraph lines, towns, and anything else they come across, while introducing the Buffalo Soldiers to guerilla warfare. The Ninth Calvary is also followed in this tale, from Santa Fe to Fort Cummings, and everywhere in between, as they try to engage this renegade bunch of Apache warriors. Using Navajos and Apaches as guides, the soldiers attempt to find the Indians, who disappear into thin air, and hide in plain sight. This is a thoroughly engrossing tale that takes the reader on a legendary journey. The story of the hidden Apache cache of gold and jewels at Victorio’s Peak that has been intriguing treasure hunters for decades, is also included in this fascinating tale. It is hard to describe all the myriad details that have been intricately woven into this well researched book, there are so many included. For historical value alone, this book is a winner, yet it will intrigue you with its tales, its characters, and its sense of location, pulling you deeper and deeper into its depths, until you find yourself fully absorbed and engrossed in the territorial history of the late 1800’s, never wanting it to end. I have never enjoyed a historical novel as much as I did this one. It is not at all what you would expect history to be, and is written unlike other history tales, not by the victors, but by all who made the history, no matter which side they were on, are given a voice in this book. This is a true historical account of the Apache Insurgency in New Mexico in 1881. -- BellaOnline.com, August 9, 2007

August 6, 2007 -- abqArts REVIEWS NEW MEXICO: A BIOGRAPHICAL DICTIONARY Both Fun and useful! Don Bullis, well-known for his knowledge of New Mexico history, has recently written "New Mexico: A Biographical Dictionary 1540-1980," an entertaining book featuring a panoply of interesting people--some famous, some infamous, some obscure. According to Bullis, the only qualification for inclusion is that the person has to have "left a mark on the state, for good or ill." In this first volume of two--or possibly a trilogy that will eventually highlight 600 people--thumbnail sketches range from the contemporary newspaper editor Mark Acuff (1940-1994), who I knew, to the 17th century Juan Zuni, a "Hopi Impersonator/Philanderer, a Santa Fe Thief," who I didn't know. It's fun to randomly flip through the pages and peruse the fascinating tidbits on famous people such as Billy the Kid (Lincoln County's outlaw and a "thief of the first order") or the not-so-well-known Mildred Clark "Madame Millie" Cusey (a southern New Mexico brothel owner) who discovered she could make more money as a prostitute than as a Harvey Girl. But it is not just fun to read. It's well researched. With sources, an extensive bibliography, and names indexed both alphabetically and grouped by exploits, the book is a useful reference tool that belongs on the shelves of southwestern writers, historians, genealogists, and anyone else who has an interest in the Land of Enchantment. Bullis has written three non-fiction books and two novels. He is also the editor and publisher for the New Mexico Historical Notebook at donbullis.biz.--Larry Greenly, abqArts, August 2007

July 18, 2007 -- ENCHANTMENT MAGAZINE REVIEWS NAVAJO AND PUEBLO EARRINGS For those interested in jewelry by early native people, this is the first book that explains the different types of earrings and the silver, copper, gold, and clay with mosaics they were made from. ... This book is an unusual angle into a part of Southwestern history that's little known -- Enchantment Magazine, July 2007

June 13, 2007 -- MIDWEST BOOKS REVIEWS NAVAJO AND PUEBLO EARRINGS In Navajo and Pueblo Earrings 1850-1945 author Robert Bauver draws upon his experience and expertise from collecting and studying Southwestern Native American jewelry for more than 30 years. Providing an informed and informative introduction to the different types of Navajo and Pueblo earrings made by Native American craftsmen from 1850 to 1945, readers will learn how these adornments were used as Bauver combines archival photographs and current photographic illustrations of examples in this documented and specialized history of Native American culture. Also available in a hardcover edition (978-1-890689-49-0, $39.95), Navajo and Pueblo Earrings 1850-1945 is a work of outstanding scholarship and a unique contribution to Native American Studies that is especially recommended to the attention of academia and non-specialized general readers with an interest in Native American Studies.--Midwest Book Review, June 2007

June 8, 2007 -- NEW MEXICO MAGAZINE REVIEWS NAVAJO AND PUEBLO EARRINGS If there is one object that seems to typify the beauty of the southwest it might be a Native American earring of turquoise and silver. Scholar Robert Bauver has written an informative and handsomely illustrated book based on one of the most complete collections of Native American earrings ever assembled. Fifty years ago, the market for old earrings was almost nonexistent, as they had little pawn value. As a result, there were many examples in trading posts and Pueblos, in old collections and on the Navajo Reservation. This book brings these earrings to light. The fascinating history begins with the introduction of silversmithing from Mexico. Silver coins were often fashion ed into simple, if weighty, hoop earrings worn by men and women alike. Shell was an original ornamentation, and then the classic turquoise, although Hubbell Trading Post also encouraged the use of glass as a substitute for the stone. Small silver balls were an early decoration, followed by all kinds of innovation from filigree--with its ancient roots in the Mediterranean--to drops and the dangling, small squash blossoms. Anyone who admires and wears Native jewelry will be intrigued to see the development of designs and the similarities to work produced today. He book includes archival photographs, including one of a Zuni cross-dresser, and looks at the veritable renaissance of jewelers at that pueblo. The book is invaluable for collectors, setting a new standard, but there is much here for the general reader as well--not least of all 50 color plates of earrings that are intricate and simple, bold and delicate, silver, turquoise and beyond--but always beautiful--New Mexico Magazine, June 2007

JUNE 8, 2007 -- NEW MEXICO MAGAZINE REVIEWS VILLAGES & VILLAGERS I placed for you on a table, a bouquet of flowers. Maria, don't be ungrateful, Give me your love. This charming and gentle song is one that the author remembers being sung--among many tunes-- in his village. The author's first collection, Memories of Cibola, tells tales of Pena's childhood on his family's sheep ranch near Grants from the 1920s to 50s. Now Pena has followed up the success of his first volume with Villages & Villagers: Stories from New Mexico Villages. Reading this book is like rummaging through an old jewelry box full of treasures, or finding a hidden shoebox of photographs and mementos. One story leads to another in a kind of treasure hunt. Each essay serves as a mini-meditation on a theme. It is often a homey subject, such as chicos, the tasty corn in the husk eaten in pueblos and villages across New Mexico. The first section is on "Villages," the second on "Villagers," then "Ranching" and the final section is titled "Change Comes to the Villages." This is on portraits of people and anecdotes, which are among the book's liveliest bits. There is "Uncle Pat," who received a beautiful Navajo rug from his father-in-law with the instructions to sell it if anything went wrong with the newlywed's marriage, and to send the bride back to her family. We meet people from priests to politicians to prizefighters to family members to just plain folks--not just in the prose but also in the numerous black-and-white photographs that adorn the text. These are fascinating archival images, which despite their formality speak of people and times gone by. The change that comes to the villages may not be unadulterated progress--the last section takes us to the events of Sept. 11--but change is accepted as part of life, from airplanes to the changes in the author's life that took him to Latin America. Although the old-timers may say, "No es como mas antes-- it isn't like it was"--the author takes a gentle philosophic look at times both past and present. A section on the Anasazi--who built, lived and disappeared--makes a strong addition to this section with its discussion of Chaco Canyon and local outliers. There is a useful glossary of Spanish terms at the end. The book preserves a lot of lore and memories of a way of life, and it is also simply enjoyable reading.-- New Mexico Magazine, June 2007

JUNE 3, 2007 -- LA HERENCIA MAGAZINE REVIEWS DAWSON JOURNAL In 1876-1877, William D. Dawson, a writer for The Santa Fe Daily New Mexican, composed a series of journalistic essays based on his travels through the New Mexico territory. His journeys took him to villages, farms, mines, Army posts and other locations that defined a region that would not be granted statehood until almost four decades later. Robert Torrez, who was the state historian at the New Mexico State Records Center and Archives from 1987 to 2000, has compiled and edited Dawson's accounts to present a fascinating and insightful portrait of New Mexico as it was 130 years ago. Dawson's narratives describe his encounters with a variety of frontier personalities--the merchants, farmers, soldiers, outlaws and hardy frontier women who called the vast open landscape home. His travels would eventually encompass the entire length of the Rio Grande, from the San Luis Valley to Mesilla and west to Silver City and Tierra Amarilla. The most striking aspects of Dawson's accounts are his descriptions of the majestic natural scenery and the stoic, entrepreneurial spirit of the inhabitants of these lands. However, as Torrez points out, Dawson's intended readership was mainly prospective emigrants from the eastern United States; consequently, he devotes special attention to Anglo-American contributions and exploitation of the region, often to the exclusion of the Hispanic participation. Only rarely does he address his attention to the significant influence of Hispanic culture and activity. This underlying attitude of minimizing Hispanic presence in contrast to "American energy and enterprise," as Dawson describes it, provides another kind of insight into the attitudes prevalent in New Mexico during this time. Despite Dawson's somewhat ethnocentric viewpoint, his reports provide an illuminating account of the changing New Mexico environment during the late 1870s. Torrez's compilation adds another perspective to the understanding of how New Mexico developed during this crucial time in its past and will interest both casual readers and scholars of state history.-- La Herencia Magazine, Summer 2007

JUNE 3, 2007 -- LA HERENCIA MAGAZINE REVIEWS VILLAGES & VILLAGERS For many readers of La Herencia, the name of Abe Pena will be familiar because he has written many articles for this magazine. This is Pena's second book on the Cibola area, which today includes the counties of Cibola and McKinley in west-central New Mexico. His first work about the area, Memories of Cibola, was widely read. In his new book, Villages and Villagers, he includes events that occurred in the 19th century and were related to him as stories. The 72 vignettes, first published as columns in the Grants Daily Beacon, are organized into four parts. The first gives a brief history of the area and events such as the cycle of fiestas, the games young people played, the foods harvested and villages that came into existence and then were deserted as people migrated out of the area. In the second part, the author writes about interesting people who played a role in the life of the area or affected the author personally. The third deals with ranching, especially sheep ranching, which the author was involved in. His stories relate the arrival of families who began to homestead or buy land in the area. It also includes ones about priests who had served in the area and were later suspended by Archbishop Lamy. The last section recalls some of the events and modern cultural elements that changed village life. World War II intrudes, the airplane arrives in the area and the author and his family head to Latin America, where he serves in the Peace Corps for 12 years. The book ends with the tragic events of 9/11. Though the topics could have been better organized, and a genealogy of his family would have been helpful, because the book consists of vignettes connected to the area and/or to the author, the book flows well. Pena is a gifted storyteller and writes in clear prose. He has preserved the stories of his villages. It would be of great value if every village or town had such a chronicler to preserve its history.--La Herencia Magazine, Summer 2007

APRIL 10, 2007 -- NEW MEXICO MAGAZINE TO REVIEW MEMORIES OF CIBOLA These stories of Hispanic life in CГ­bola County, west central New Mexico, are organized into 6 parts for each of the locales covered.В  Within each section, for example, part one, focusing on the village of Seboyeta, are stories of the people, places, and activities, essentially between 1920-1950, but some reaching back to colonial times.В  Many of the stories, some previously published in issues of the CГ­bola County Beacon (formerly the Grants Daily Beacon) newspaper, describe aspects of the sheep business, New Mexico's leading industry from colonial times until the mid-19th century but still a viable business in CГ­bola County until about the mid-1960s, especially in concert with cattle ranching.В  In fact, the author points out that under proper management sheep and cattle "do better than either alone." And he certainly knows the sheep business as he studied wool production at the University of New South Wales, Australia, while a Fulbright scholar, returning to the United States where he became foreman on one of New Mexico's largest sheep operations. Village life in San Mateo, San Rafael, Grants, Fort Wingate, the tradition of la matanza (a community-wide event of pig slaughtering for lard for the holidays, held in the late fall or early winter), the Lebanese settlers, various ranches, holidays and special events, people, and many other stories are related in detail in the book. Hardly a traditional enterprise but very significant economically to CГ­bola County,В  Ambrosio Lake, 25 miles north of Grants, produced more uranium from 1950 to 1980 than any other place in the world.В  A glossary, index and bibliography round out this interesting book of folk history.В  After managing the family ranch at San Mateo the author was director of the Peace Corps in Honduras, then directed Peace Corps and USAID programs in several other Latin American countries. -- New Mexico Magazine

APRIL 9, 2007 -- EL PASO TIMES REVIEWS NEW MEXICO: A BIOGRAPHICAL DICTIONARY New book out about New Mexicans One of my favorite regional authors happens to be Don Bullis, a Southern New Mexico historian. And his latest book, a softcover item of 300 pages is titled "New Mexico: A Biographical Dictionary: 1540-1980." (Rio Grande Books, Albuquerque). Bullis isn't sure how many volumes there will be, although he assumes at least three. Nevertheless, Volume 1 covers 600 or so entries ranging from A to Z, so Bullis obviously missed a few this first time around, but not to worry ... he will catch up in forthcoming editions. Even so, 600 fascinating personalities the first time around is a whopping number of figures of significance, and each gets at least a paragraph and usually a picture. One is Robert A. Allison, better known historically as Clay Allison, a gunfighter who killed roughly 15 men, later buried near Pecos, Texas after he fell off a freight wagon. Another was Joseph A. Ancheta, a refugee whose family fled Mexico during the 1850s. He graduated from Notre Dame, served in the New Mexico state legislature, but was slain by shots fired through a window probably intended for political boss Tom Catron. And speaking of Thomas Benton Catron, a Santa Fe Ring member and long-time political boss of New Mexico, his biography shows he owned about 2 million acres and had an interest in another 4 million. Catron County, the state's largest, is named after him. He and Albert B. Fall were the only two U. S. senators from New Mexico to be elected by the state Legislature (1911). Nationally known historian Thomas Chavez gets nice coverage, Bullis pointing out that in 1997 he received the Distinguished History Award Medal from the Daughters of the American Revolution. John Chisum, the Cattle King of New Mexico, is covered, as is John Milton Chivington, who saved New Mexico from occupation during the Civil War. Nor does Bullis miss Erna Fergusson, the "Grand Dame of New Mexico Letters," nor Henry Flipper, the first black man to graduate from West Point, a man who served and fought during the Indian Wars. (Flipper also lived quite a while in El Paso, during this period becoming an agent for New Mexico Sen. Fall.) Col. Albert Jennings Fountain, whose death in White Sands is still mysterious, is covered well, as is train robber Black Jack Ketchum. Nearby New Mexico rancher Oliver Milton Lee gets good coverage, as do Gen. Ranald Mackenzie, Susan Shelby Magoffin, James Magoffin, a few Lincoln County War figures such as Henry Antrim, alias Henry McCarty, alias Billy the Kid. Interestingly, even Fred Nolan, born and raised in England and still living there, gets good coverage, primarily because of his books relating to New Mexico's Lincoln County War. And of course, many participants in that war also get described. Even old John Selman, best known as the slayer of John Wesley Hardin, and buried along with Hardin (although in a different area) in El Paso's Concordia Cemetery, is mentioned. For regional readers, "New Mexico: A Biographical Dictionary" is a keeper.--Leon Metz, historian, El Paso Times

MARCH 29, 2007 -- RIO GRANDE SUN REVIEWS NEW MEXICO: A BIOGRAPHICAL DICTIONARY From Smokey Bear to the “Sundance Kid” from Pablita Velarde, Jake Viarial to Jeff Bingaman and Pete Domenici, New Mexico: A Biographical Dictionary is a must read for anyone interested about individuals who influenced our state’s legacy. Historian Don Bullis compiled and wrote New Mexico: A Biographical Dictionary and stated that this book represents “a cross section of people who have had an influence on life – and sometimes death – in the Land of Enchantment.” Hot off the press from Rio Grande Books – publishers of Tradición Revista Magazine - I found the book packed with a wealth of fascinating historical tidbits. New Mexico: A Biographical Dictionary is organized alphabetically by last name and includes a short biographical sketch of each individual listed. In addition, some black and white photographs are included throughout the book. The earliest entry begins with Etevanico, a Moroccan slave, who is recognized as the first non-Indian to enter Pueblo Country in 1539. Although as New Mexicans we recognize the historical legacy of indigenous leaders and presence long before European arrival, Estevanico is a prominent figure because he served as a guide for Fray Marcos de Niza who set out from New Spain in search of the Seven Cities of Cibola. While flipping through the pages I recognized many prominent leaders as well as not so prominent leaders that I would not normally think about when it comes to remembering New Mexico’s influences. For example, some of these include Dennis Weaver, who starred in the long running television series Gunsmoke. Weaver also starred in McCloud as a Taos Marshall named Sam McCloud. Others mentioned are Television Actor Bill Dailey, most known for his role in I Dream of Jeannie, who retired in Albuquerque and the “Rhinestone Cowboy” Glen Campbell who spent time in New Mexico and performed in several Albuquerque venues. I was delighted to read about the legendary Buddy Holly and his New Mexico connection. Holly worked with Norman Petty in Clovis and recorded That’ll Be the Day, which attracted the attention of Decca Records. Among U.S. Presidents, Herbert Hoover is noted for signing the legislation that created Carlsbad Caverns National Park in 1930. And, Abraham Lincoln is noted as making a number of appointments including that of Henry Connelly as Governor of New Mexico. Among Pueblo people President Lincoln is revered for giving each of the Pueblo Governors the “Lincoln Canes” which were recognized as a symbol of sovereignty in the 1860s – which continues to present day. The issuing of canes is not mentioned in the book. And more importantly, readers should remember the biographical sketches are not meant to be exhaustive but serve as citations for further research. From the previous publications by Don Bullis on the Old West it is not a surprise to read about outlaws such as Davy Crockett and William Henry Bonney aka “Billy the Kid.” But, it is quite fitting in New Mexico history and modern day influences to read about folks like the legendary Al Hurricane, Albuquerque Astronaut Sidney Gutierrez and the auto racing Unser Family. New Mexico: A Biographical Dictionary has a good overview of what I call the “classic notables.” These include Po’Pay, leader of the Pueblo Revolt in 1680, Anthropologist Adolphe Bandelier, J. Robert Oppenheimer, Maria Martinez, San Ildefonso Potter, U.S. Senator Dennis Chavez, Rudolfo Anaya and the late Storyteller and Linguist Esther Martinez of Ohkay Owingeh. In the Introduction, Bullis states that this is not a complete work and not all historically significant New Mexicans are to be found in these pages. This is Volume I in what will hopefully become a series of notable individuals who influenced New Mexico. This book represents a significant step to capture notable leaders, artists, outlaws and educators. A future publication should ideally build upon this and include biographical sketches of those who shaped New Mexico history like the first woman Governor of Isleta Pueblo, Verna Teller, and Dr. Beryl Blue Spruce the first Pueblo Indian physician,as well as inclusion of U.S. President Richard M. Nixon who signed over Blue Lake to Taos Pueblo in 1970. Regardless, New Mexico: A Biographical Dictionary offers a valuable step for students interested in pursuing further research about the famous and infamous people who influenced our state. This first volume should and must be read for those interested in New Mexico’s historical and cultural legacy. -- Matthew J. Martinez, Ohkay Owingeh Rio Grande Sun, March 29, 2007

MARCH 9, 2007 -- FOREWORD MAGAZINE REVIEWS VILLAGES & VILLAGERS In the villages we get up early. Old timers used to say, ‘Nos levantamos con las gallinas.’ We get up with the chickens,” the author writes. Residents and ex-residents of northwestern New Mexico will probably recognize, or even share, many of the names of those who settled the small town of San Mateo. In this, his second book, native-son Peña enriches and deepens the story of a band of pioneers who, in 1800, undertook the trek from the settlement of Albuquerque across wild country to occupy a land grant in what was essentially Indian country. With the help of the U.S. Army, the area designated as the “Merced de Cevolleta” was settled by its thirty grantees, and just about the time Seboyeta was becoming a center of growth, a few families, attracted by vast grasslands on the side of Mount Taylor, gradually developed both sheep and cattle ranches. This later exodus collected settlers from the new area to form the village of San Mateo, the origin of most of the tales in the new book. There’s no quicker way into the heart of a culture than to hear it retold in the voice of someone who’s been steeped in it since childhood, and former rancher and foreign service officer Peña has just that voice. Inserted throughout the book, stacks of photos back up his story to illustrate not only the life and times of the author, but chronicle a way of life and the changing environment that supports it. Any story that follows the development of a new community, from its first straggling pilgrims, through the establishment of schools, local government, and plans for work and recreation, is going to have its sorrows, its minor and major tragedies, and its petty squabbles, but on the whole this is a jolly book, and among its jolliest parts are the many “dichos” (pithy statements in traditional language, often rhymed) bandied about daily by the population and often quoted in the local news, a custom with Hispanic roots that creates laughter with a touch of wisdom and often a heavy dose of sarcasm. Early in the book there’s a chapter devoted to local usage, which sets a tone that pervades daily life, family values, and a community level that combines respect for everyone and a humorous approach to the fallibility of personal endeavor. “No hay atajo sin trabajo (There’s no herd without sweat)” warns that ranching doesn’t just happen, and that “de los dos no se hace uno” (referring to the fact that two incompetents don’t add up to one good worker).” These “dichos” are part of daily life wherever Spanish is spoken, with a history that extends back beyond Ferdinand and Isabella and will no doubt carry forward a love of life and language to the last Hispanic community on the last frontier in the world. -- ForeWord Magazine, May/June 2007

MARCH 7, 2007 -- PRIME TIME MAGAZINE REVIEWS VILLAGES & VILLAGERS В В  Longtime Prime Time readers will remember Abe Pena's easy, warm, down-to-earth narratives of the world in which he grew, learned, married, ranched and observed his neighbors. Many have read Memories of Cibola, his first, respected book. Now Rio Grande Books in Los Ranchos has reprinted that volume and Abe's latest work, Villages & Villagers. I have read only Marc Simmon's foreword, in which--after describing Abe as storyteller, folklorist and historian-- he writes that Abe "shines as a keen observer of the human condition." Don't wait for me-- pick up one or both.--Arthur Alpert, Prime Time, March 2007.

FEBRUARY 10, 2007 -- NEW MEXICO MAGAZINE REVIEWS DAWSON JOURNAL    In December 1876 The Daily New Mexican newspaper, in Santa Fe, sent one of their reporters on a nine-week trip to southern New Mexico to file dispatches on his observations, which were subsequently printed in the paper. In September 1877, he took a similar trip throughout northern New Mexico, Placed in context with contemporary promotional literature encouraging settlement of New Mexico by citizens from other parts of the country and immigrants—actually the relative dearth of such material—Dawson’s submissions were important in that they provided current information on New Mexico’s communities, industries, forts, residents, and geographic features. They are as interesting to read today as encapsulations of New Mexico history.    Dawson’s articulate images of the string of communities along the Rio Grande in southern New Mexico are picturesque: the villages of Alamosito, La Joya, Rio Puerco, Polvadera, Soccoro, San Antonio, San Marcial, and others are described. The Jornada del Muerto (Journey of Death), the desert stretch of El Camino Real basically from Socorro to Las Cruces, is covered in good detail. Dawson and his party visited Fort McRae, Fort Selden, and Fort Cummings, and he portrays the Mesilla Valley as the “garden spot of New Mexico.”    Dawson’s impressions of his northern New Mexico trip are equally detailed, even including a chemical analysis of the mineral spring water at Ojo Caliente. He describes how the Taos Valley was impacted by a two-year grasshopper infestation.    The author is well-known to northern New Mexico as the former state historian at the New Mexico State Records Center and Archives, and author of UFOs Over Galisteo and Other Stories of New Mexico’s History (UNM Press, 2004). Rio Grande Books, an imprint of LPD Press, is a regional publishing company featuring books on Southwestern history and culture. -- New Mexico Magazine, March 2007

November 12, 2006 -- ALBUQUERQUE JOURNAL REVIEWS NEW MEXICO: A BIOGRAPHICAL DICTIONARY Dictionary Illuminates Noted New Mexicans At last a dictionary I can read without being accused of spending time at a pursuit my wife finds laughable. I infrequently open a tattered Random House unbridged dictionary, flip through the pages, look up words strange to me and learn their definitions. Don Bullis has come to the rescue. He's researched and edited the first volume of a biographical dictionary containing people who lived in New Mexico— or whose names are linked to what was a territory and what is today the state— over a period of 440 years. There are the famous and infamous, the historically noteworthy and those worthy of obscurity. The famous and infamous include people you'd expect to be here— William Henry Bonney (aka Billy the Kid,) 16th century Spanish explorer Alvar Nuñez Cabeza de Vaca, mountain man/soldier Christopher "Kit" Carson, writer-historian Manuel Ezequiel (Fray Angélico) Chávez, Ohkay Owingeh storyteller Esther Martinez and San Ildefonso Pueblo potter Maria Martinez. Two bits says most readers probably haven't heard of many others in the book's listings. Julian "Paddy" Martinez? The book says he was a Navajo from McKinley County whose tombstone refers to him as a uranium pioneer. Or John Milne? He was superintendent of Albuquerque Public Schools from 1911 to 1956. Milne Stadium is named for him. His APS tenure, Bullis writes, is reportedly the longest of any superintendent of any larger school district in the country. Or José Maria "Joe" Gonzales? After serving as Guadalupe County sheriff in the mid-1940s, he was night marshal for the town of Santa Rosa. Thirteen days into that night job he was stabbed and killed. You'll find plenty of lawmen in this dictionary; many names Bullis draws from his own compilation "New Mexico's Finest." Bullis gives an explanation for his approach in organizing the new book. "My purpose was to include an eclectic mix of the people that I've found interesting, and significant, over nearly 40 years of daily reading and research into New Mexico's past," he writes in his introduction. Bullis promises a second volume and perhaps a third to make the effort more inclusive -- David Steinberg, Albuquerque Journal November 12, 2006

November 2, 2006 -- ANOTHER SOLID REVIEW FOR NAVAJO AND PUEBLO EARRINGS Reference and Research Book News- University Press Book News (November 2006 Volume 21, no. 4) has given Navajo and Pueblo Earrings a solid review, noting, "A longtime student of Native American culture and collector of Southwestern jewelry, with knowledge gained first-hand from Navajo silversmiths, shares his expertise on earrings made from the mid-19th to mid-20th centuries. In what is presented as the first book to focus on the different styles, materials, and techniques used of this jewelry whose value is being rediscovered, Bauver provides examples of some 300 pairs of earrings in archival and new photos (including 49 color plates) in cultural context."

October 9, 2006 -- POSH MAGAZINE REVIEWS NEW MEXICO BIOGRAPHICAL DICTIONARY BOOK Bullis is well known for his knowledge of New Mexico history, which he shares weekly as editor and publisher for the New Mexico Historical Notebook e-zine www.donbullis.biz. Following and expanding the tradition of his earlier 99 New Mexicans ... and a few other folk, this first volume of a planned multi-volume set features 600 New Mexicans from the famous (the Unser family) to the infamous (Billy the Kid) to the historic (Lucien Maxwell) and the unsung (Henry Love) with the only basic qualification, according to the author's introduction, being that "they left a mark on the state, for good or ill." Indexed and annotated to serve as a research tool, this book is equally interesting to those interested in dipping into New Mexico's unique history. -- POSH Magazine, Fall/Holiday 2006

October 9, 2005 -- CATHOLIC SOUTHWEST REVIEWS FAT VICAR The Catholic Southwest, A Journal of History and Culture has reviewed Wake for a Fat Vicar in its Volume 17, 2006. The review notes: This is a most interesting read not only becasue of the colorful story, the people and the times, but also because of its historiographical vigor and vividness. History is important when it is true to the sources from which it is creatively written. Prejudice is not a lovely word, nor is it a lovely perspective. In completing this final volume of his deceased uncle's revisionist trilogy about the Catholic Church in the nineteenth-century New Mexico, and three of the prinicpal native clergy in that story, the author has offered a history which suggests that bias, historical and otherwise, intentional or unintentional, is an easy temptation, but withal a transparent and vulnerable temptation: Let's look at the sources!

October 9, 2006 -- TODAY'S BOOKS REVIEWS NAVAJO AND PUEBLO EARRINGS BOOK Today's Books has given Navajo and Pueblo Earrings a "Must Read!" review in its October 2006 Best of Publishing List.

October 9, 2006 -- POSH MAGAZINE REVIEWS NAVAJO AND PUEBLO EARRINGS BOOK Replete with photos, the book chronicles the history of Native American earrings using Gallegos' twenty-year collection. A short, well-written history opens the book and the bulk is made up of photographs paired with captions discussing the genesis of the earrings pictured. A comprehensive index makes the book attractive to the scholar while the photos will attract the casual browser. This is the perfect book for anyone who has succumbed to the enchantment of silver and turquoise. -- POSH Magazine, Fall/Holiday 2006

August 3, 2006 -- MIDWEST BOOK REVIEWS GIVES HIGH MARKS TO NAVAJO AND PUEBLO EARRINGS BOOK Navajo And Pueblo Earrings 1850-1945: Collected By Robert V. Gallegos by Robert Bauver (a dedicated collector, expert and scholar of Southwestern jewelry for more than thirty years) is a photographic and descriptive showcase presented especially for collectors and aficionados of Navajo and Pueblo jewelry. Full-color photographs and extensive text entries for over 300 pairs of earrings allow the reader to experience the masterwork and subtlety in Navajo and Pueblo creations as surely as if seeing them in person. A brief introduction and history of Navajo and Pueblo earrings rounds out this respectful collection.

July 31, 2006 -- abqARTS PROCLAIMS NAVAJO AND PUEBLO EARRINGS A MUST FOR COLLECTORS Navajo and Pueblo Earrings 1850-1945 is a beautifully illustrated book featuring more than 120 pairs of earrings chosen from the 350-piece earring collection of Robert V. Gallegos--the most complete collection of historic Native American earrings in existence. The book opens with the history of personal adornment. Archival photographs (including an Edward Curtis on the cover) and contemporary magazine illustrations offer glimpses of what was popular at the time. Color plates of detailed, close-up photos--complemented with their history and useful information--of a progression of earrings round out the book. Endnotes and references then complete the book. Author Robert Bauver has collected Southwestern jewelry for more than three decades. As a scholar, he consolidated all existing information on the subject and added his own first-hand knowledge concerning Navajo and Pueblo artisans. And kudos to the publisher for the overall quality of the book. -- Larry Greenly, AbqArts, August 2006

JUNE 1, 2006 -- ANGLICAN AND EPISCOPAL HISTORY FEATURES HOLY FAITH OF SANTA FE If readers of Anglican and Episocpal History think that there are enough local studies of parishes and therefore conclude they can skip this new addition to the genre, they need to revise their thinking. Good parish studies connect what happens at the congregational level (the people in the pews) with national and international movements and events. Lehmberg's background as a distinguished scholar in the field of English church history gives him an unusual frame of reference for examining the history of a parish church in the American Southwest. It is a lens that has resulted in his writing a comprehensive and well-researched parish study that goes beyond the local and speaks to the contemporary unresolved crisis in national and international Anglicanism. It is an example of how the analysis of local church history can illuminate our understanding of the major trends and challenges that face Episcopalians in the United States today. -- Anglican and Episcopal History, June 2006

December 31, 2005 -- NEW MEXICO HISTORICAL REVIEWS FEATURES SAINTS OF THE PUEBLOS Carrillo provides brief historical background on each pueblo and its patron saints and then describes the salient characteristics of the pottery produced at the pueblo. His insights into this subject are thoughtful and provocative. The book serves as a poignant and useful reminder of the Catholic traditions of the Pueblo Indians meshed as they are in subtle ways with traditional indigenous spiritual practices. The book is attractively designed and produced. -- William Wroth, New Mexico Historical Review, Winter 2006

December 31, 2005 -- NEW MEXICO HISTORICAL REVIEWS REVIEWS TAPESTRY OF KINSHIP Over the past seventy years there has been a great deal of scholarly interest in the origins of the distinctive tradition of New Mexico santos (painted and sculpted images of saints) and the different styles that became prominent in the florescent period of New Mexican image-making, ca. 1800-1860. The most recent and exciting research in this field appears in A Tapestry of Kinship by Jose Antonio Esquibel and Charles M. Carrillo.The authors combine exhaustive documentary research in the Archdiocese of Santa Fe Museum and Archives and the Spanish and Mexican Archives of New Mexico with stylistic and technical analysis of actual peices. Existing documentary records concerning the early arts in New Mexico are few compared to those of other regions. However, by diligent search into the extant records the authors have oput together a convincing picture of the close network of relationships that existed among families of carpenters and image-makers in Santa Fe prior to 1860. Further, they have suggested possible new identifications of the artists responsible for existing bodies of work, thereby beginning to solve questions which have concerned scholars for many years. With the density and complexity of documentary data presented here, this book is geared toward the scholar and aficionado of the art of the santero, rather than the general public. The publishers are to be congratulated for publishing such a scholarly work, with obviously so limited an audience. While the book is focused on the work of a small group of carpenters and santeros, implicit in it are larger issues concerning the fabric of life in Santa Fe. Using the methods so ably employed by Esquibel and Carrillo, a much fuller picture than we currently have could be drawn of the cultural and socio-economic history of early-nineteenth-century New Mexico. -- William Wroth, New Mexico Historical Review, Winter 2006

December 17, 2005 -- MIDWEST BOOKS REVIEW SHOWCASES RELIGIOUS ARCHITECTURE OF NEW MEXICO The December 2005 Small Press Bookwatch contains a review of Religious Architecture of Hispano New Mexico By Tom Lucero and Father Tom Steele. The review notes, "Architect Thomas L. Lucero and scholar Thomas J. Steele, S.J., present Religious Artchitecture in Hispano New Mexico, a slender yet detailed study of the structure and architecture of churches. Setting forth a classification system that can prove most helpful when comparing distinct types of Hispanic religious architecture in New Mexico, this book is filled with black-and-white diagrams and photographs as well as extensive text description, historical summaries, and more. A thoroughly researched and invaluable guide for architecture students, designers, and scholars seeking to better understand the form, purpose and function of Hispanic New Mexican places of worship."

December 10, 2005 -- NM MAGAZINE REVIEWS RELIGIOUS ARCHITECTURE OF NEW MEXICO The January 2006 issue of New Mexico Magazine contains a review of Religious Architecture of Hispano New Mexico By Tom Lucero and Father Tom Steele. The review notes, "This little book is a concise discourse on the structure and architecture of New Mexico’s old Catholic religious structures: churches, chapels, and moradas (chapter houses of the penitentes), written by an architect and a New Mexico religious history scholar. The book comes with its own classification system for ranking New Mexico’s ecclesiastic buildings: by presence or absence of characteristic traits such as side chapels, clerestories, raised floor altars, and other features. After reading the book and examining the drawings and photos, the reader will undoubtedly come away with a new understanding of New Mexico’s Hispanic adobe sanctuaries, after only 48 pages, not counting the endnotes and a glossary."

July 26, 2005 -- WESTERN HISTORICAL QUARTERLY REVIEWS WAKE FOR A FAT VICAR The Western Historical Quarterly has reviewed Wake for a Fat Vicar in its Summer 2005 issue. It notes, "Chavez and Chavez seek to overturn the standard interpretation of Ortiz as an obstinate and corrupt man who selfishly resisted losing his leadership post among Catholics in New Mexico. More than a biography, this book is a rejoinder to the Anglo-centric historiography that commonly portrays mid-nineteenth-century New Mexico Catholics as hopefully superstitious and ignorant. The authors convincingly show that Lamy and Machebeuf arrived in New Mexico from France in 1851 more disposed to believe descriptions of New Mexico written by anti-Catholic or racist Americans than they were willing to learn about the region from its own inhabitants."

July 25, 2005 -- TAPESTRY OF KINSHIP REVIEWED IN SW MISSION REVIEW The Southwestern Mission Research Center SMRC Revista has reviewed A Tapestry of Kinship by Jose Esquibel and Charlie Carrillo in its Spring issue. The review notes, "The authors’ research into the identification and genealogies of New Mexican santeros, “saint-makers,” has resulted in this careful, scholarly examination of the relationships between sculptors and carpenters. This well-documented text, which includes genealogical charts of the Aragon, Casados, Ortega, Lucero, Dominguez, and Benavides families, would seem to leave no doubt of their thesis. Included are color illustrations of bultos of saints by members of the Aragon, Benavides, and Casados families. This is a lovely little book, one that all who have an interest in the religious art of New Mexico will want to read."

July 23, 2005 -- WEEKLY ALIBI REVIEWS RELIGIOUS ARCHITECTURE BOOK Steven Robert Allen of the Weekly Alibi has reviewed Religious Architecture of Hispano New Mexico by Thomas Lucero and Thomas Steele. He notes, "A new book put out by LPD Press, a local outfit based in Los Ranchos de Albuquerque, claims to be the first major explanation of the architecture of New Mexico's Hispanic churches since George Kubler's landmark publication in 1940. At the heart of this new book is an intriguing method of classifying New Mexican Hispano architecture based on the increasing complexity of architectural elements, from the simplest residence to the most elaborate mission church. The book is informative, and it offers a classification system that would probably be useful to many amateur and professional enthusiasts of New Mexico's Catholic architecture."

April 25, 2005 -- HOLY FAITH OF SANTA FE REVIEWED BY HISTORICAL SOCIETY OF EPISCOPAL CHURCH The Historiographer of the National Episcopal Historians and Archivists and the Historical Society of the Episcopal Church reviewed Holy Faith of Santa Fe by Stanford Lehmberg, noting "his expertise ... has resulted in a balanced and detailed history. All these aspects of Santa Fe are evident at Holy Faith, which makes its history so interesting to read."

January 11, 2005 -- SOUTHWEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR SELECTS FOUR LPD BOOKS The Southwest Books of the Year 2004, sponsored by the Tucson-Pima Public Library, the Arizona Historical Society, and the Arizona Humanities Council, have selected four books by LPD Press for inclusion in the prestigious annual list of the most important books about the American Southwest published in 2004. The books include Saints of the Pueblos, A Tapestry of Kinship, Wake for a Fat Vicar, and Holy Faith of Santa Fe. All four books are available in the Mercado section of this website.

January 11, 2005 -- SAINTS OF THE PUEBLOS REVIEWED BY TODAY'S BOOKS Today's Books of Sacramento, CA, reviewed Saints of the Pueblos, Must Read!

January 3, 2005 -- A TAPESTRY OF KINSHIP REVIEWED A Tapestry of Kinship by Dr. Charles M. Carrillo and Jose Antonio Esquibel has been reviewed by the Reviewers Consortium. "A Tapestry of Kinship: The web of influence among Escultores and Capinteros in the Parish of Santa Fe, 1790-1860 by Jose Antonio Esquibel and Charles M Carrillo is a scholarly research into identifying four Escultores and Carpinteros of the nineteenth century. While historical documents do not exist, Esquibel and Carrillo research is a compilation of visual memory weaving it to families and kinships. These two scholars' backgrounds meld their expertise in genealogy, history, and teaching with the addition of Carrillo's worldwide recognition as a leading santero artist. This exquisite book will interest anyone who loves history, Hispanic culture and art, Santa Fe and all that the Southwest has to offer. I highly recommend this book." People of God, the monthly publication of the Archdiocese of Santa Fe, also reviewed A TAPESTRY OF KINSHIP. The Consortium Reviews, Santa Fean Magazine, and the Santa Fe New Mexican also reviewed A TAPESTRY OF KINSHIP -- "It's a serious work but written invitingly so that everyone from the most devoted collector of art to the once-in-a-while shopper at Spanish Market can enjoy what Carrillo and Esquibel have discovered."

January 3, 2005 -- SAINTS OF THE PUEBLOS NAMED BEST BOOKS 2004 WINNER Saints of the Pueblos by Charlie Carrillo has been selected as "Best Books 2004" Art Book Winner by USA BOOK NEWS. "Saints of the Pueblos offers readers a glimpse into the rich Hispanic and Native American art and history of the Mission Pueblos of the Southwestern United States. A beautiful full color title that you will want to keep in your permanent library." USABookNews.com People of God, the monthly publication of the Archdiocese of Santa Fe, also reviewed SAINTS OF THE PUEBLOS. The Consortium Reviews, Santa Fean Magazine, and the Santa Fe New Mexican also reviewed Saints of the Pueblos -- "For those who can't understand the close relationship between the Pueblo people and the Catholic Church . . ., this book is a must-read."

January 3, 2005 -- HOLY FAITH IN SANTA FE REVIEWED Southwest BookViews, a quarterly publication of reviews on books in the Southwest, featured a review of HOLY FAITH OF SANTA FE by Stanford Lehmberg in the summer 2004 issue. The review notes, "Holy Faith of Santa Fe is engrossing, illuminating, and written in a lively narrative style. . . this is an excellent church history" The New Mexico Historical Review also reviewed HOLY FAITH OF SANTA FE: "Twenty-some years ago, Robert Torrez and I commiserated with each other about the troubles each of us was having while writing a centennial book for a parish, he for San José at Los Ojos, I for Immaculate Conception in Albuquerque. ?Where had the documents gone? Why are there so few pictures? Who do so few past events make sense today?? Pastors rarely think history, for they assume they’ll move on sometime soon. Stanford Lehmberg has repeated a few of our complaints, but with his background he has produced a very substantial book, made it look easy, and made it enjoyable. Lehmberg, former professor at Texas-Austin and professor and department chair at Minnesota, vacationed often in Santa Fe until he and his wife moved there for good. Dr. Lehmberg has benefited by twenty-seven years of experience at St. Clement’s Church, Saint Paul, MN, from the viewpoint of organist and choir-director. In this book he has brought his deep knowledge of the reformation-era English Church to bear on the problems of nineteenth- and twentieth-century Epsicopalianism. The first three chapters, from the Civil War to World War I, the leading figures were local laity: former Catholic priest José Manuel Gallegos (groom at the first Episcopal wedding in New Mexico), L. Bradford Prince and his wife, William G. Ritch, Senator and Mrs. Thomas Catron, Bronson Cutting, and Mr. And Mrs. Rufus Palen, a Santa Fe mover-and-shaker. Prince, appointed territorial chief justice and later territorial governor, brought his immense energy and his domineering personality to bear on the priests, many of whom left Santa Fe as soon as they could. The second era (1918-65) saw new buildings (think John Gaw Meem) and the beginning of social-gospel outreach to the greater community of the city and the county of Santa Fe. Chapters 8 to 10 cover the troubled times of Vietnam, civil rights, Watergate, and the ?open society? with all their tensions. The years from 1995 to the turn of the millennium present a successful but hard-won return to the good times of understanding and cooperation within the congregation. Historians ought to tell stories well, and Lehmberg narrates the history of Santa Fe’s Episcopal Church of the Holy Faith (in Spanish, that’s ?Santa Fe?). The history occupies about 200 pages, with 45 black-and-white and 19 color illustrations, four appendices, and a thorough index. Lehmberg had the advantage of Bishop James Stoney’s and Beatrice Chauvenet’s fine books as well as good humor and dry wit in the Anglican tradition, as exemplified on page 75: ?In September [1939], a new faucet was selected for the Sacristy, for which the Holy Faith Guild paid and which the Rector installed, eliminating a bill from the plumber.? Some readers thrive on lists of figures and derive enlightenment from them, and Lehmberg embeds even these statistics in readable prose; and therefore when he returns to historical narrative - his accounts of ?ideological issues, personalities, and controversies, as well as the history of buildings, architecture, and music? (p. 8) - the non-statistical reader can kick back and enjoy a book that is user-friendly throughout. Today's Books of Sacramento, CA, reviewed Holy Faith of Santa Fe, Exceptional! The Santa Fe New Mexican also reviewed this book.

January 3, 2005 -- WAKE FOR A FAT VICAR REVIEWED The MidWest Book Review ran a review of Wake for a Fat Vicar by Fray Angelico Chavez and Thomas Chavez. The review notes that "The third title in a trilogy of works showcasing the lives of Hispanic leaders of the Roman Catholic Church in New Mexico during the middle of the nineteenth century, Wake For A Fat Vicar: Father Juan Felipe Ortiz, Archbishop Lamy, And The New Mexican Catholic Church In The Middle Of The Nineteenth Century is an in-depth account of the life and contributions of Padre Juan Felipe Ortiz and his activities with and in behalf of the Catholic community he served. Extensively researched, richly detailing Ortiz's life, virtues, and weaknesses, Wake For A Fat Vicar transports the reader through time in its deft accounting of an era gone by, populated with the people who lived, strived, who believed with a fervent faith and comprised an active and enduring Christian community." The Santa Fe New Mexican ran a review of Wake for a Fat Vicar by Fray Angelico Chavez and Thomas Chavez. The review notes that "Wake is an admirable and significant addition to our understanding of a fascinating and pivotal period in New Mexico's history." The Reviewers Consortium has released a review of LPD Press' new book, "Wake For A Fat Vicar Father Juan Felipe Ortiz, Archbishop Lamy, and the New Mexican Catholic Church in the Middle of the Nineteenth Century, by Fray Angelico Chavez & Thomas Chavez, sets before readers an outstanding book addressing misconceptions about Archbishop Lamy, Father Juan Felipe Ortiz and the New Mexican Catholic Church in the nineteenth century. This collaboration between uncle, Fray Angelico Chavez, and nephew, Thomas Chavez, brings an unusual and very strong scholarly perspective. Fray Chavez's broad understanding of the ecclesiastical and Thomas Chavez, a professional historian, brings a full dimension to this fascinating time and place in New Mexico. This book reads like an adventure into the nineteenth century. It has wonderful black and white photographs, extensive footnotes, copies of original documents, and a broad bibliography. This reviewer highly recommends this book to libraries, university classes in religion, history and Latin American studies. Lay people will enjoy this book as it is very well written and interesting to read."Today's Books of Sacramento, CA, reviewed Wake for a Fat Vicar, Very Good!. Wake for a Fat Vicar was also reviewed by La Herencia.

January 3, 2005 -- NICHOLAS HERRERA: VISIONS OF MY HEART NAMED RUNNER-UP IN 2004 DIY BOOK AWARDS The 2004 DIY Book Festival in Los Angeles has honored LPD Press with a Runner-up Award for Nicholas Herrera: Visions of My Heart in the Art/Photography Category. The Reviewers Consortium has reviewed Nicholas Herrera: Visions of My Heart. The Consortium notes, "This book is so rich in history, culture, and folk art. Anyone who visits New Mexico should read this book." The Colonial Latin American Historical Review (CLAHR) has reviewed NICHOLAS HERRERA: VISIONS OF MY HEART in the Fall issue. CLAHR noted, "Wonderfully illustrated with colorful examples of Herrera’s artwork and collection (painting, sketches, tinwork, and carving, for example), this book is recommended to art historians and the general reader." Today's Books of Sacramento, CA, reviewed 3 of our books in their May 2004 Book Reviews Report. Here's what they said about the three books — Nicholas Herrera: Visions of My Heart, Must Read! The editors of ForeWord have announced finalists in the magazine’s sixth annual Book of the Year Awards, which recognize excellence in publishing from independent presses — and one of LPD Press offerings is on the list of finalists.
The LPD Press biography of artist Nicholas Herrera — Nicholas Herrera: Visions of My Heart — was chosen as a finalist in the Biography category in the 2003 Book of the Year competition. The book, written by Barbe Awalt and Paul Rhetts of Albuquerque, is the seventeenth book by the small regional publisher that specializes in Hispanic art and culture and New Mexico religious history. LPD Press also publishes a quarterly magazine, Tradicion Revista. This is the ninth book written by Awalt and Rhetts on the Hispanic Southwest. Their first book was Charlie Carrillo: Tradition & Soul, which was released in 1994. The New Mexico Magazine, Folk Art Messenger, El Hispano News, and Enchantment have reviewed Nicholas Herrera: Visiones de mi Corazon. The Santa Fe New Mexican has reviewed Nicholas Herrerra: Visiones de mi Corazon -- "Barbe Awalt and Paul Rhetts provide able commentary for the exceptional wealth of color photographs, 357 irresistible images in a 128-page book. Choosing to explore his unique vision, acknowledging that this vision comes from listening to his heart, Nick Herrera has created a “take-no-prisoners” body of work. Herrera’s passion for life and the life around him is contagious. Clearly, Herrera has moved beyond clichéd expectations of traditional Hispanic art; it is outspoken and heartfelt. While professional critics are trying to figure him out and where he might fit in the “santero tradition,” there is a real possibility that these Visions of the Heart, religious or rowdy, are tradition come alive for those who know what it like to grow up in Northern New Mexico." The SouthWest BookViews has reviewed Nicholas Herrerra: Visiones de mi Corazon -- "The title Visions of My Heart suits this inspired book about New Mexico santero Nicholas Herrera, whose artistic range demonstrates a vision that draws from his unfathomable heart, ingenious mind, deft hands and a sense of his own abilities. His work speaks for itself, stirring both the heart and the imagination. Barbe Awalt and Paul Rhetts have produced another outstanding addition to their expanding list of books and other works about the art and artists of Northern New Mexico. The text on every page devoted to his art is accompanied by stunning photographs in vivid color and sharp detail. The pages of Nicholas Herrera: Visiones de mi Corazón, Visions of My Heart clearly exhibit the professional planning and execution that went into its production. All who are interested in the art and artists of New Mexico will want to add this book to their collections." The Midwest Book Reviews has reviewed Nicholas Herrerra: Visiones de mi Corazon -- "The collaborative effort of Barbe Awalt and Paul Rhetts, Nicholas Herrera: Visions Of My Heart is a remarkable art history and biography of Nicholas Herrera, an Hispanic sculptor and folk artist possessed with a unique vision that encompasses god, political perceptions, and the stirring of emotion within the human breast. Vibrant full-color photographs by John T. Denne of Herrera's masterworks enhanced the thoughtful commentary essays of Cathy L. Wright, Chuck Rosenak, and Charles M. Carillo which along with the main text and individual captions, combine for an truly memorable introduction to a unique artist in terms of his life and his work." Book News of Portland says: "A beautifully illustrated volume on the life and work of contemporary New Mexico folk artist Nick Herrera (b. 1964). It traces his life trajectory, friends and family, influences, patrons, galleries and exhibits and is abundantly color illustrated to show his retablos and bultos, santos and crucifixes, altars, popular art, and more." The 2004 Southwest Books of the Year Awards included NICHOLAS HERRERA: VISIONS OF MY HEART. "

January 3, 2005 -- FACES OF FAITH Reviewed The Reviewers Consortium has reviewed Faces of Faith Rostros de Fe. The Consortium notes, "This book will be an important addition to all libraries. I highly recommend it to anyone interested in New Mexico Hispanic culture and art. It is a must read for anyone who is visiting the state." The 2004 Southwest Books of the Year Awards included FACES OF FAITH.

January 3, 2005 -- Archbishop Lamy Reviewed A review of ARCHBISHOP LAMY: IN HIS OWN WORDS appeared in the Catholic Historical Review. The review notes that "it is an interesting perspective on Lamy and this volume will be helpful to those pursuing larger questions in terms of nineteenth century religious history." New Mexico Historical Review (Vol. 78, no.1). The review says, in short: "...While Steele's conclusions regarding Lamy are hardly surprising, the reader has a splendid time getting there. ... A particular strength of the book is Steele's readable prose. His style is concise, clear, and frequently witty. ... Even more problematic and troubling is the modern assumption that historians, using very limited resources, may successfully probe the psyche of an individual long dead. Nonetheless, Steele's efforts here have much to be commended."

January 3, 2005 --CHARLIE CARRILLO TRADITION & SOUL Reviewed The Reviewers Consortium has reviewed Charlie Carrillo Tradition & Soul. The Consortium notes, "This is a beautiful book . . . This book is necessary for all who have a passion for fine art."

DECEMBER 31, 2004 -- COLONIAL LATIN AMERICAN HISTORICAL REVIEW FEATURES SAINTS OF THE PUEBLOS Carrillo's book is about the Pueblo Indians' devotion to maintaining their religious connections through the saints introduced to them by Hispano settlers nearly four hundred years ago. Colorfully illustrated, this little book is a treasure trove about the New Mexico pueblos with quick references to their histories, their patron saints, and the attendant feast day of each one. It is recommended for researchers, writers, tourists, and students of religious art. -- Colonial Latin American Historical Review, Winter 2004

DECEMBER 31, 2004 -- COLONIAL LATIN AMERICAN HISTORICAL REVIEW FEATURES A TAPESTRY OF KINSHIP Jose Esquibel and Charles Carrillo have combined their talents to produce a study about four notable santeros or escultores who influenced the traditional religious art of New Mexico. Within a web of influence they fashioned adaptions of this tradition to create works of devotional art that were practical and met a growing demand for local production of such art. This book is recommended for genealogists dealing with Hispanic families and the general reader interested in New Mexico's religious art. -- Colonial Latin American Historical Review, Winter 2004

DECEMBER 31, 2004 -- COLONIAL LATIN AMERICAN HISTORICAL REVIEW FEATURES RELIGIOUS ARCHITECTURE Thomas Lucero and Father Thomas Steele have, in the space of one small book, encompassed a great deal of information about New Mexico's historic Hispanic churches. To that end, the authors have devised a classification of features that should be considered in evaluating a structure and provide a list of these. In a somewhat satirical way, the authors decry the way New Mexico churches and chapels are described by some authors. Visitors to historical churches and chapels in New Mexico, or, for that matter, throughout the Greater Southwest, are well advised to carry a copy of this little book in their vehicles. It is highly recommended to the general reader. -- Colonial Latin American Historical Review, Winter 2004

DECEMBER 31, 2004 -- COLONIAL LATIN AMERICAN HISTORICAL REVIEW FEATURES DEJAD A LOS NINOS John Taylor's well-illustrated book is about the history of the parish church in Peralta, New Mexico--Our Lady of Guadalupe Church. Readers will be interested in this historical record. -- Colonial Latin American Historical Review, Winter 2004

DECEMBER 31, 2004 -- COLONIAL LATIN AMERICAN HISTORICAL REVIEW FEATURES HOLY FAITH OF SANTA FE Lehmberg's book contributed much toward understanding the nineteenth-century history of Santa Fe, New Mexico, following the Anglo-American takeover in 1846. The book is highly recommended for those interested in general Church history, but also in this church in particular, which is set in the context of Santa Fe's complex history. -- Colonial Latin American Historical Review, Winter 2004

December 24, 2004 -- Consortium Reviews A TAPESTRY OF KINSHIP A Tapestry of Kinship by Dr. Charles M. Carrillo and Jose Antonio Esquibel has been reviewed by the Reviewers Consortium. "A Tapestry of Kinship: The web of influence among Escultores and Capinteros in the Parish of Santa Fe, 1790-1860 by Jose Antonio Esquibel and Charles M Carrillo is a scholarly research into identifying four Escultores and Capinteros of the nineteenth century. While historical documents do not exist, Esquibel and Carrillo research is a compilation of visual memory weaving it to families and kinships. These two scholars' backgrounds meld their expertise in genealogy, history, and teaching with the addition of Carrillo's worldwide recognition as a leading santero artist. This exquisite book will interest anyone who loves history, Hispanic culture and art, Santa Fe and all that the Southwest has to offer. I highly recommend this book.

November 26, 2004 -- SAINTS OF THE PUEBLOS NAMED BEST BOOKS 2004 WINNER Saints of the Pueblos by Charlie Carrillo has been selected as "Best Books 2004" Art Book Winner by USA BOOK NEWS. "Saints of the Pueblos offers readers a glimpse into the rich Hispanic and Native American art and history of the Mission Pueblos of the Southwestern United States. A beautiful full color title that you will want to keep in your permanent library." USABookNews.com

September 29, 2004 -- NICHOLAS HERRERA: VISIONS OF MY HEART NAMED RUNNER-UP IN 2004 DIY BOOK AWARDS The 2004 DIY Book Festival in Los Angeles has honored LPD Press with a Runner-up Award for Nicholas Herrera: Visions of My Heart in the Art/Photography Category. Awards will be presented in Los Angeles at the annual Book Festival in early October.

August 26, 2004 -- PEOPLE OF GOD Reviews TAPESTRY OF KINSHIP and SAINTS OF THE PUEBLOS People of God, the monthly publication of the Archdiocese of Santa Fe, reviewed A TAPESTRY OF KINSHIP and SAINTS OF THE PUEBLOS in its August 2004 issue. August 23, 2004 -- New Review of Archbishop Lamy In Catholic Historical Review! A new review of ARCHBISHOP LAMY: IN HIS OWN WORDS appeared in the Catholic Historical Review. The review notes that "it is an interesting perspective on Lamy and this volume will be helpful to those pursuing larger questions in terms of nineteenth century religious history."

August 18, 2004 -- Consortium Reviews SAINTS OF THE PUEBLOS Saints of the Pueblos by Dr. Charles M. Carrillo will become a treasure for readers whose interests are the Pueblo and Hispanic cultures and arts of New Mexico. Carrillo combines the Catholic saint of a pueblo and design elements from that Pueblos early pottery and creates a unique retablo. Every Pueblo and the four abandoned Pueblos are honored with their own piece. The Indian Pueblo Culture Center in Albuquerque, New Mexico will host the opening of the exhibit. Saints of the Pueblos has beautiful color photographs of each retablo, pictures of the pottery, and black and white photographs from some of the Pueblos. I highly recommend this book and look forward to seeing the exhibit in August 2004. Museums across the country should consider inquiring about having this exhibit.

July 23, 2004 --SANTA FEAN Features SAINTS OF THE PUEBLOS The August issue of the SANTA FEAN magazine features SAINTS OF THE PUEBLOS. They note, "In Saints of the Pueblos, prizewinning santero Dr. Charles Carrillo combines artistic tradition with historical research to create a visual testament to the role patron saints have played in linking New Mexico's Hispanic and Pueblo cultures."

July 22, 2004 --Consortium Reviews NICHOLAS HERRERA VISIONS OF MY HEART The Reviewers Consortium has reviewed Nicholas Herrera: Visions of My Heart. The Consortium notes, "This book is so rich in history, culture, and folk art. Anyone who visits New Mexico should read this book."

July 22, 2004 --Consortium Reviews CHARLIE CARRILLO TRADITION & SOUL The Reviewers Consortium has reviewed Charlie Carrillo Tradition & Soul. The Consortium notes, "This is a beautiful book . . . This book is necessary for all who have a passion for fine art."

July 22, 2004 --Consortium Reviews FACES OF FAITH The Reviewers Consortium has reviewed Faces of Faith Rostros de Fe. The Consortium notes, "This book will be an important addition to all libraries. I highly recommend it to anyone interested in New Mexico Hispanic culture and art. It is a must read for anyone who is visiting the state."

July 18, 2004 -- SANTA FE NEW MEXICAN REVIEWS A TAPESTRY OF KINSHIP AND SAINTS OF THE PUEBLOS The Santa Fe New Mexican reviewed both A TAPESTRY OF KINSHIP and SAINTS OF THE PUEBLOS in the July 18 edition of the paper. Regarding A TAPESTRY OF KINSHIP, they noted, "It's a serious work but written invitingly so that everyone from the most devoted collector of art to the once-in-a-while shopper at Spanish Market can enjoy what Carrillo and Esquibel have discovered." About SAINTS OF THE PUEBLOS, they note, "For those who can't understand the close relationship between the Pueblo people and the Catholic Church . . . , this book is a must-read."

July 18, 2004 - - SAINTS OF THE PUEBLO and TAPESTRY OF KINSHIP FEATURED IN ALBUQUERQUE JOURNAL The Albuquerque Journal featured both SAINTS OF THE PUEBLOS by Chartlie Carrillo and A TAPESTRY OF KINSHIP by Jose Equibel and Charlie Carrillo in the Book section on Sunday, July 18.

July 16, 2004 -- COLONIAL LATIN AMERICAN HISTORICAL REVIEW REVIEWS NICHOLAS HERRERA The Colonial Latin American Historical Review (CLAHR) has reviewed NICHOLAS HERRERA: VISIONS OF MY HEART in the Fall issue. CLAHR noted, "Wonderfully illustrated with colorful examples of Herrera’s artwork and collection (painting, sketches, tinwork, and carving, for example), this book is recommended to art historians and the general reader."

July 11, 2004 -- SOUTHWEST BOOKVIEWS REVIEWS HOLY FAITH IN SANTA FE Southwest BookViews, a quarterly publication of reviews on books in the Southwest, featured a review of HOLY FAITH OF SANTA FE by Stanford Lehmberg in the summer 2004 issue. The review notes, "Holy Faith of Santa Fe is engrossing, illuminating, and written in a lively narrative style. . . this is an excellent church history."

June 5, 2004 -- Two Books Reviewed in La Herencia Wake for a Fat Vicar and Holy Faith of Santa Fe have been reviewed in the summer issue of La Herencia.

June 1, 2004-- NM Historical Review to Run Review of HOLY FAITH OF SANTA FE The New Mexico Historical Review is scheduled to run a review of HOLY FAITH OF SANTA FE by Stanford Lehmberg. An advance look at the review follows: "Twenty-some years ago, Robert Torrez and I commiserated with each other about the troubles each of us was having while writing a centennial book for a parish, he for San José at Los Ojos, I for Immaculate Conception in Albuquerque. ?Where had the documents gone? Why are there so few pictures? Who do so few past events make sense today?? Pastors rarely think history, for they assume they’ll move on sometime soon. Stanford Lehmberg has repeated a few of our complaints, but with his background he has produced a very substantial book, made it look easy, and made it enjoyable. Lehmberg, former professor at Texas-Austin and professor and department chair at Minnesota, vacationed often in Santa Fe until he and his wife moved there for good. Dr. Lehmberg has benefited by twenty-seven years of experience at St. Clement’s Church, Saint Paul, MN, from the viewpoint of organist and choir-director. In this book he has brought his deep knowledge of the reformation-era English Church to bear on the problems of nineteenth- and twentieth-century Epsicopalianism. The first three chapters, from the Civil War to World War I, the leading figures were local laity: former Catholic priest José Manuel Gallegos (groom at the first Episcopal wedding in New Mexico), L. Bradford Prince and his wife, William G. Ritch, Senator and Mrs. Thomas Catron, Bronson Cutting, and Mr. And Mrs. Rufus Palen, a Santa Fe mover-and-shaker. Prince, appointed territorial chief justice and later territorial governor, brought his immense energy and his domineering personality to bear on the priests, many of whom left Santa Fe as soon as they could. The second era (1918-65) saw new buildings (think John Gaw Meem) and the beginning of social-gospel outreach to the greater community of the city and the county of Santa Fe. Chapters 8 to 10 cover the troubled times of Vietnam, civil rights, Watergate, and the "open society" with all their tensions. The years from 1995 to the turn of the millennium present a successful but hard-won return to the good times of understanding and cooperation within the congregation. Historians ought to tell stories well, and Lehmberg narrates the history of Santa Fe’s Episcopal Church of the Holy Faith (in Spanish, that’s "Santa Fe"). The history occupies about 200 pages, with 45 black-and-white and 19 color illustrations, four appendices, and a thorough index. Lehmberg had the advantage of Bishop James Stoney’s and Beatrice Chauvenet’s fine books as well as good humor and dry wit in the Anglican tradition, as exemplified on page 75: "In September [1939], a new faucet was selected for the Sacristy, for which the Holy Faith Guild paid and which the Rector installed, eliminating a bill from the plumber." Some readers thrive on lists of figures and derive enlightenment from them, and Lehmberg embeds even these statistics in readable prose; and therefore when he returns to historical narrative - his accounts of "ideological issues, personalities, and controversies, as well as the history of buildings, architecture, and music" (p. 8) - the non-statistical reader can kick back and enjoy a book that is user-friendly throughout.

May 1, 2004 -- Today's Books Reviews 3 Books Today's Books of Sacramento, CA, reviewed 3 of our books in their May 2004 Book Reviews Report. Here's what they said about the three books — Nicholas Herrera: Visions of My Heart, Must Read!; Holy Faith of Santa Fe, Exceptional!; and Wake for a Fat Vicar, Very Good!. Today's Books rated the Herrera book in the top 10 percent of new book published and distributed in the U.S. Check out these books in the Mercado section.

April 21, 2004 --Consortium Reviews Wake for a Fat Vicar The Reviewers Consortium has released a review of LPD Press' new book, "Wake For A Fat Vicar Father Juan Felipe Ortiz, Archbishop Lamy, and the New Mexican Catholic Church in the Middle of the Nineteenth Century, by Fray Angelico Chavez & Thomas Chavez, sets before readers an outstanding book addressing misconceptions about Archbishop Lamy, Father Juan Felipe Ortiz and the New Mexican Catholic Church in the nineteenth century. This collaboration between uncle, Fray Angelico Chavez, and nephew, Thomas Chavez, brings an unusual and very strong scholarly perspective. Fray Chavez's broad understanding of the ecclesiastical and Thomas Chavez, a professional historian, brings a full dimension to this fascinating time and place in New Mexico. This book reads like an adventure into the nineteenth century. It has wonderful black and white photographs, extensive footnotes, copies of original documents, and a broad bibliography. This reviewer highly recommends this book to libraries, university classes in religion, history and Latin American studies. Lay people will enjoy this book as it is very well written and interesting to read."

April 6, 2004 -- WAKE FOR A FAT VICAR REVIEWED BY MIDWEST BOOK REVIEWS The MidWest Book Review ran a review of Wake for a Fat Vicar by Fray Angelico Chavez and Thomas Chavez. The review notes that "The third title in a trilogy of works showcasing the lives of Hispanic leaders of the Roman Catholic Church in New Mexico during the middle of the nineteenth century, Wake For A Fat Vicar: Father Juan Felipe Ortiz, Archbishop Lamy, And The New Mexican Catholic Church In The Middle Of The Nineteenth Century is an in-depth account of the life and contributions of Padre Juan Felipe Ortiz and his activities with and in behalf of the Catholic community he served. Extensively researched, richly detailing Ortiz's life, virtues, and weaknesses, Wake For A Fat Vicar transports the reader through time in its deft accounting of an era gone by, populated with the people who lived, strived, who believed with a fervent faith and comprised an active and enduring Christian community."

April 1, 2004 -- WAKE FOR A FAT VICAR REVIEW IN SANTA FE NEW MEXICAN The Santa Fe New Mexican ran a review of Wake for a Fat Vicar by Fray Angelico Chavez and Thomas Chavez. The review notes that "Wake is an admirable and significant addition to our understanding of a fascinating and pivotal period in New Mexico's history."

March 21, 2004 -- LPD PRESS SELECTED AS FINALIST IN BOOK OF THE YEAR The editors of ForeWord have announced finalists in the magazine’s sixth annual Book of the Year Awards, which recognize excellence in publishing from independent presses — and one of LPD Press offerings is on the list of finalists. The LPD Press biography of artist Nicholas Herrera — Nicholas Herrera: Visions of My Heart — was chosen as a finalist in the Biography category in the 2003 Book of the Year competition. The book, written by Barbe Awalt and Paul Rhetts of Albuquerque, is the seventeenth book by the small regional publisher that specializes in Hispanic art and culture and New Mexico religious history. LPD Press also publishes a quarterly magazine, Tradicion Revista. This is the ninth book written by Awalt and Rhetts on the Hispanic Southwest. Their first book was Charlie Carrillo: Tradition & Soul, which was released in 1994. LPD Press will release four books in 2004 on Southwestern history and art — Wake for A Fat Vicar by Fray Angelico and Dr. Tom Chavez (released in Feb. 2004), Holy Faith of Santa Fe by Dr. Stanford Lehmberg (released in Feb. 2004), Saints of the Pueblos by Dr. Charles M. Carrillo (to be released in July 2004), and A Tapestry of Kinship by José Antonio Esquibel and Charles Carrillo (to be released in July 2004). According to Paul Rhetts, “We have won many regional and Southwest awards for our books, website, and magazine, but this is the first national award and we are very happy to share this with Nick and John Denne, the primary photographer for this book.” ForeWord Magazine is the only literary review trade journal devoted exclusively to covering independent presses who range in size from university presses putting out hundred of titles each year to micro, POD, and ebook publishers who may put out one title in a lifetime. From over a thousand entries, each category is pared to a pool of 8-10 finalists. From that pool, a jury of librarians and booksellers selects the top three entries based on editorial excellence ad professional production as well as the orginality of the narrative and the value that the book adds to its genre. Finalists in all categories of the 2003 ForeWord Book of the Year Awards were announced on March 19th; category awards will be announced at the BookExpo of America on June 3 in Chicago. The Book of the Year Awards program was set up specifically for booksellers and librarians to share in the process of discovering gems from each of these types of publishers in a number of popular categories, and who base judgments on their own authority in each category and on patron/customer interests.

February 16, 2004 -- New Review of HOLY FAITH OF SANTA FE The Santa Fe New Mexican says that HOLY FAITH OF SANTA FE "offers a slice of Santa Fe history for the rest of the world to enjoy."

January 27, 2004 -- Collectors take note Bucknell World has published a review of Nicholas Herrera: Visions of My Heart. "Paul Rhetts and Barbe Awalt have co-authored several lush art books profiling regional art of the Southwest. The latest is Nicholas Herrera: Visions of My Heart (LPD Press), an appreciation of an outsider artist poised for international fame."

January 16, 2004 -- SOUTHWEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR The 2004 Southwest Books of the Year Awards have been announced by the Tucson-Pima Public Library and two books from LPD Press have been included in the list -- FACES OF FAITH by Barbe Awalt and NICHOLAS HERRERA: VISIONS OF MY HEART by Barbe Awalt and Paul Rhetts.

January 15, 2004 -- Major article features Book on Holy Faith Church The Santa Fe New Mexican ran a major article on the forthcoming book Holy Faith of Santa Fe by Stanford Lehmberg which will be released in February 2004.

January 14, 2004 -- ANOTHER REVIEW FOR NICHOLAS HERRERA: VISIONS OF MY HEART The New Mexico Magazine has reviewed Nicholas Herrera: Visiones de mi Corazon. This is the eighth major review on this book.

January 12, 2004 -- ANOTHER REVIEW FOR NICHOLAS HERRERA: VISIONS OF MY HEART The Enchantment has reviewed Nicholas Herrera: Visiones de mi Corazon.

January 10, 2004 -- ANOTHER REVIEW FOR NICHOLAS HERRERA: VISIONS OF MY HEART The SouthWest BookViews has reviewed Nicholas Herrerra: Visiones de mi Corazon -- "The title Visions of My Heart suits this inspired book about New Mexico santero Nicholas Herrera, whose artistic range demonstrates a vision that draws from his unfathomable heart, ingenious mind, deft hands and a sense of his own abilities. His work speaks for itself, stirring both the heart and the imagination. Barbe Awalt and Paul Rhetts have produced another outstanding addition to their expanding list of books and other works about the art and artists of Northern New Mexico. The text on every page devoted to his art is accompanied by stunning photographs in vivid color and sharp detail. The pages of Nicholas Herrera: Visiones de mi Corazón, Visions of My Heart clearly exhibit the professional planning and execution that went into its production. All who are interested in the art and artists of New Mexico will want to add this book to their collections."

January 8, 2004 -- The Santa Fe New Mexican has reviewed Nicholas Herrerra: Visiones de mi Corazon -- "Barbe Awalt and Paul Rhetts provide able commentary for the exceptional wealth of color photographs, 357 irresistible images in a 128-page book. Choosing to explore his unique vision, acknowledging that this vision comes from listening to his heart, Nick Herrera has created a ?take-no-prisoners? body of work. Herrera’s passion for life and the life around him is contagious. Clearly, Herrera has moved beyond clichéd expectations of traditional Hispanic art; it is outspoken and heartfelt. While professional critics are trying to figure him out and where he might fit in the ?santero tradition,? there is a real possibility that these Visions of the Heart, religious or rowdy, are tradition come alive for those who know what it like to grow up in Northern New Mexico."

January 6, 2004 -- The Midwest Book Reviews has reviewed Nicholas Herrerra: Visiones de mi Corazon -- "The collaborative effort of Barbe Awalt and Paul Rhetts, Nicholas Herrera: Visions Of My Heart is a remarkable art history and biography of Nicholas Herrera, an Hispanic sculptor and folk artist possessed with a unique vision that encompasses god, political perceptions, and the stirring of emotion within the human breast. Vibrant full-color photographs by John T. Denne of Herrera's masterworks enhanced the thoughtful commentary essays of Cathy L. Wright, Chuck Rosenak, and Charles M. Carillo which along with the main text and individual captions, combine for an truly memorable introduction to a unique artist in terms of his life and his work."

January 5, 2004 -- Archbishop Lamy: In His Own Words is the subject of another book review; this one in the Winter 2003 issue of the New Mexico Historical Review (Vol. 78, no.1). The review says, in short: "...While Steele's conclusions regarding Lamy are hardly surprising, the reader has a splendid time getting there. ... A particular strength of the book is Steele's readable prose. His style is concise, clear, and frequently witty. ... Even more problematic and troubling is the modern assumption that historians, using very limited resources, may successfully probe the psyche of an individual long dead. Nonetheless, Steele's efforts here have much to be commended."

January 3, 2004 -- NEW REVIEW of Nicholas Herrera: Visiones de mi Corazon -- Book News of Portland says: "A beautifully illustrated volume on the life and work of contemporary New Mexico folk artist Nick Herrera (b. 1964). It traces his life trajectory, friends and family, influences, patrons, galleries and exhibits and is abundantly color illustrated to show his retablos and bultos, santos and crucifixes, altars, popular art, and more."